I was at a Brit Milah yesterday for my second cousin, Nuriel. He is named after his father’s father, my great uncle, who died when he was 45 years old and I was too young to know him well. He was a doctor.
 
 For Ashkenazi (European, intellectually centered in Germany) Jews, children are named after the dead and rarely after the living. In Sephardic (Spanish and Middle Eastern, my personal heritage) Jewry, children are named after the living and rarely after the dead. I am named after my mother’s father, who is still, Baruch Hashem, living and wonderful, and after my father’s father’s father. The grandfather is named Jacob in English. I don’t know if the great grandfather had an English name, but his Farsi name is the equivalent of Jacob.
 
 Nuriel is also named after his grandfather, but against the general tradition of Sephardi baby naming, he is named after the dead.

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