Politics, Government, Sexual Harassment

Clueless Andrew Cuomo and What the Scandal Should Teach Us

Sexual harassment will remain common until it is better understood and more aggressively prosecuted

John Dean
Politically Speaking
4 min readAug 12, 2021

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Newspaper Screenshot by J. Dean

We won’t have Andrew Cuomo to kick around in few days. The allegations of 11 women, most of them state employees, did him in. He not-so-graciously resigned, still not admitting his guilt, and cast his resignation as some sort of public sacrifice. The resignation was to free New York of a “distraction” that undermined the government’s ability to govern, the governor said.

Assuming Cuomo’s behavior included the acts of harassment and assault detailed in Attorney General James’ report, Cuomo should have resigned. He should also face criminal prosecution for the specific act of assault included in the report — grabbing a woman’s breast.

Will prosecutors pursue Cuomo? That remains to be seen. They should, but the probability is less than 50–50. That estimate is based on what has happens to other well-known sexual harassers. Take Donald Trump, for example.

Trump’s history of sexual harassment and assault is more like Jeffrey Epstein’s than Cuomo’s. In contrast to Trump, Cuomo looks like an awkward adolescent. Trump looks…

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John Dean
Politically Speaking

Writing on politics, photography, nature, the environment, dogs, and, occasionally, humor. Editor of Dean’s List.