Democrats

In Politics: Fast and Slow. More on Medium.

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AP photo

Trump’s firing of Secretary of Defense Mark Esper, two months before leaving the White House, may mean Trump is keeping a domestic military intervention in his playbook.

Esper publicly rebuffed President Trump’s invocation of the Insurrection Act in June. Trump wanted to use that act to justify Esper sending active-duty military troops into cities experiencing violence associated with protests. Esper’s statement, “I do not support invoking the Insurrection Act,” was counter to the president’s wish. Trump told Fox News,”Look, it’s called insurrection. We just send them in, and we do it very easy.”

At that time, Trump was referring to the massive urban unrest that was occurring over the police killings of several Black citizens, many of whom were unarmed. Those protests and the ancillary lootings have largely disappeared. …


Democrats must meet Trump in the battle for public opinion; journalists need to investigate the extent of (false flag) voter fraud

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Right now, as a consequence of the media declarations Saturday, Democrats on social media are looking ahead to the upcoming Biden administration with little thought given to Donald Trump’s vow to pursue legal means.

However, allegations of voter fraud are running rampant through Republican social media, from the president on down — on Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube (and maybe others).

There is talk of faulty voter counter systems, people voting illegally, illegally backdating ballots, and illegal ballot dumps. Many of these allegations have been tweeted by the president to his 80 million Twitter followers, and other Republicans with many thousands of followers on Twitter. …


Facts that might be helpful.

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Biden phone bankers have flexibility when talking to respondents about reasons for voting for Biden. In the following column, I aim to give Biden phone bankers facts that might be raised to support these reasons. For each potential reason below, a number of facts are offered.

Biden would be better for the economy and stock market.

A study by Princeton economics professors in 2014 showed that, historically, the U.S. economy grows faster, more jobs are produced, corporate profits are higher, and the stock market is higher when a Democrat is president compared to a Republican. They reported that the differences were “startlingly large.”

Even before the coronavirus, in Trump’s first three years, the stock market underperformed that of the first three years of Obama by all the leading stock market indexes. …


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Donald Trump plays politics as a game to win. And he never, never admits defeat. He is always victorious. He whips his mask off on the White House balcony to show that he has conquered the coronavirus pandemic. His supporters love it. Trump is the ultimate showman.

Nevertheless, the Republican party realizes that Trump may lose his re-election. Consequently, the R’s are doing some really hard work. They are registering more new voters than the Democrats are in key swing states. They also have a massive door-belling campaign to get their supporters out. Meanwhile, the Democrats are eschewing that practice so as to not spread the pandemic. Instead they are relying on personal phone calls and social media . …


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photo by Rachel Cooper, “The “Authority of Law” marble statue by sculptor James Earle Fraser on the steps of the Supreme Court Building.

The Senate Judiciary Committee begins hearings Mon., Oct. 12, on the appointment of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. Her seat on the court will solidify its already very conservative majority.

National polls have shown that most citizens do not wish her, or anyone, to be appointed until after the presidential election. A few Democrats have argued that if Barrett is appointed, seats should be added to the Supreme Court to balance its philosophical views.

President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence both asked their Democratic opponents in the recent debates whether they would pack the court, presumably with liberals. Both former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris danced around the issue, never answering the question. …


A look from a pair of worried eyes seven seas away.

Praying | Plea | Request | Please Forgive
Praying | Plea | Request | Please Forgive
Photo by Ben White on Unsplash

The time of elections is nigh and the people of the strongest ‘free world’ country are again subjected to the ravings of a madman, who just might sway them again in his favor. Trump is a person who has made a mockery of the prestigious office he holds, and the amount of emotional abuse his whimsical and sometimes downright abhorrent behavior has put Americans and the world through has made people somewhat numb to it, to the point that no one is surprised anymore when they hear that Trump has yet again done or said something stupid.

An Unparalleled Lust for Power

I remember when Trump ran for office the last time. He reached new lows of behavior unbecoming a politician by his complete lack of morals and ethics. It is incredulous to know that he does not even condemn the Ku Klux Klan or Neo-Nazis just because they vote for him. …


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I am a 22-year-old leftist. For the last decade of my political life, liberals have called me a naive idealist. From debate tournaments, to Democratic caucuses, to dinner-table-debates, I have endured dozens of lectures from life-long Democrats who see my radicalism as a dangerous folly of youth — something to be lauded at times, scolded at others, and ultimately, outgrown.

Treating leftism like a toddler’s mistake, these Democrats have told me bedtime stories warning of the dangers and failures leftism has wrought in American political life.

Their story goes something like this:

When I was 3-years-old, naive leftists who voted for Nader over Gore handed the country to Bush and thrust the nation into war. …


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The party conventions revealed the chasm between liberalism and populism.

Under Biden, the Democratic Party will pursue its tradition of being the liberal party: steadily moving policies forward to expand social services and individual legal rights. The Republican Party, under Trump, is now not so much a conservative force to maintain the status quo as it is a populist party seeking to break the status quo in reaction to the threat of liberalism.

Liberalism in America reflects the core philosophy of the establishment left. But liberalism is not socialism, as Donald Trump and Republican National Convention speakers would like the public to believe. Historically, liberalism is a rather steadying force. It is often seen as accommodating change, but not pushing radical change. In many other developed countries, the liberal parties are the most conservative party. …


Here’s a two-pronged plan for appealing to these voters.

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Several factors increase the likelihood that Joe Biden’s 2020 campaign will focus on messages that appeal to left-wing voters, potentially neglecting moderate and right-wing voters:

1) Most people working on Biden’s campaign are likely to be solid Democrats, and they may favor messages that are appealing to them, not necessarily the aggregate of impressionable voters.

2) Voters reaching out to the Biden campaign to shape its platform are likely to be left-wingers who would rather vote for Biden, not Donald Trump. Moderates and right-wing voters will be less likely to reach out to the Biden campaign because they may not be aware that it is strong on issues they care about. (The Biden campaign’s job is to inform voters of these strengths. …

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