The Art of Misdirection: How to Obfuscate a Future Simulation

Dr Stuart Woolley
Predict
Published in
3 min readMar 21, 2023

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A future intelligence practicing security through quantum obscurity?

Image generated by the author using Stable Diffusion

Over the past several years there’s been a great deal of thought, discussion, and sometimes even heated debate around the possibility of us¹ existing in a simulation.

I’ve touched on a few different possibilities myself in previous articles — it’s an interesting conjecture, after all — ranging whether some kind of simulation is our future evolutionary imperative, or how we possibly may escape such a simulation if we’re somehow trapped in it, or even the possibility of us being imprisoned in a simulation deliberately for some future crime that we don’t even know about, yet.

A common issue that arises is how we may escape such a simulation, if we are in one. Therefore, and to that end, we must investigate how we could possibly detect if we’re in one at all in the first place before we can even set our minds towards addressing the problem.

Leaving aside the possibility that such a simulation may be reprogrammable, in real time, to erase such thoughts from its inhabitants (to prevent its detection), it is very likely that other methods may be employed by the architects of the construct to prevent such a realisation from taking place.

Such a method may be the deliberate obfuscation of the building blocks of the simulation itself, the very voxels that make up its 3-dimensional manifestation.

Again, this is assuming that the future machines running the construct are computationally constrained in some way — as if they are not, realistically, then the simulation could go right on down to the quantum world. Or, at least what we may see as the quantum world, which may itself be a simulation of what lies beneath.

It’s at this point my head begins to hurt, so let’s look at our world as it is now, our universe, and investigate where its lower limits of introspection lie.

Image generated by the author using Stable Diffusion

What better way would there be to keep things under control than to limit the examination of a simulation in such a way as to restrict the inhabitants…

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Dr Stuart Woolley
Predict

Worries about the future. Way too involved with software. Likes coffee, maths, and . Would prefer to be in academia. SpaceX, Twitter, and Overwatch fan.