Why Asexual Visibility Matters

Yes, that includes the whole asexual spectrum

Phoenix
Prism & Pen

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Four playing cards, each of them aces.
Photo by Praveen kumar Mathivanan on Unsplash

Content warning: mention of sexual harassment, discussion of internalized acephobia, and a brief mention of being pressured into sexual situations.

I started to think I was broken in high school.

My friends began to talk about sex more — and in a serious way, not the “middle-schoolers who think sex is hilarious and weird” way. I didn’t join these conversations at first, so they started joking about how “innocent” I was. It was funny to them, but only in the way that someone not knowing a pop culture reference was funny.

Something to laugh at, and then fix.

I still remember one peer in particular. He would hold up his tablet and say, “Phoenix, look,” only for me to turn and see graphic pornography on the screen. Two friends had to start covering my eyes before I looked, since I never expected it.

One of these friends happened to be asexual, and I found myself relating to him and his attitude toward sex. I didn’t understand our other friends or feel understood by them, but I felt like he understood me, at least.

Looking back, I should’ve realized I was asexual a lot sooner.

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Phoenix
Prism & Pen

Neurodivergent and queer writer of both fiction and nonfiction. He/they. Check out my recommendations (affiliate links): https://benable.com/nebulanix