Sam Butler
Feb 6, 2017 · 2 min read

The fact that it stands for General Data Protection Regulation won’t help. This article should, however.

The General Data Protection Regulation is the European Union’s updated data privacy law

Twenty-two years ago, the world was a different place. Mobile phones hardly fulfilled 50% of the phrase’s dictionary definition, you probably thought an “internet” was what men had in their swimming shorts, and “data” was a character on Star Trek. But you were too busy listening to garage music to watch that.

In 1995, the European Commission produced the snappily-named Directive 95/46/EC, known to humans as the Data Protection Directive. As a Directive, it was passed out like a template to the then 15 member nations to implement their own laws. In the UK, this resulted in the Data Protection Act 1998, which has been the overriding data protection legislation for nearly two decades.

Conversely, when the European Union wants to enact law directly across its now 28 member nations, it issues a Regulation. The General Data Protection Regulation is one such law, and it was enacted in May 2016 to come into effect across the Union in May of 2018.

The GDPR represents a modernisation of existing data protection legislation across Europe, and aims to harmonise the varying interpretations of and additions to the 1995 Directive that exist across the continent. It’s good for businesses that trade across borders, as they’ll be able to benefit from a single legislative framework, but brings with it many changes and additions that will place further compliance burden upon businesses from Ireland to Italy.

It introduces the concept of privacy by design and aims to have governments, businesses and charities protect the rights of EU citizens to the privacy of their personal data by protecting it from loss, inaccuracy, obscurity or undue retention. It also introduces the statutory position of Data Protection Officer for organisations that process personal data in certain ways, and makes noncompliance a very expensive prospect.

Rather than looking at the looming legislation as a burden to your businesses or organisation, Privada aims to turn it to your advantage, helping you not only avoid fines, but demonstrate best practice and use this to improve relations with your customers. If you’re interested in saving time and money, we might just be able to help.

Privada

Privada disrupts the data protection compliance landscape by putting our clients’ interests first, helping them to do what they do best, whether that’s business or charity, so data privacy becomes a badge of honour, not a burden.

Sam Butler

Written by

Senior Data Protection Consultant

Privada

Privada

Privada disrupts the data protection compliance landscape by putting our clients’ interests first, helping them to do what they do best, whether that’s business or charity, so data privacy becomes a badge of honour, not a burden.

Welcome to a place where words matter. On Medium, smart voices and original ideas take center stage - with no ads in sight. Watch
Follow all the topics you care about, and we’ll deliver the best stories for you to your homepage and inbox. Explore
Get unlimited access to the best stories on Medium — and support writers while you’re at it. Just $5/month. Upgrade