The Genius Behind Damian Goidich

Zach Krasner
Apr 29, 2018 · 16 min read
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I have a fondness for old cinema (especially silent movies), and 19th century photography. Both of these are an endless source of inspiration.

I have a fondness for old cinema (especially silent movies), and 19th century photography. Both of these are an endless source of inspiration.I enjoy early 20th century newspaper comics and illustration, and have a deep love of the comic book art of Jack Kirby. I’m an avid reader and bibliophile, and have far more books than a person should be allowed to have, though I believe you can never have too many of them. I would like to relocate to the Northeastern US as soon as I am able, with Maine, Vermont or New Hampshire as destinations, so HEY all you New Englanders! Help a guy out!

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But I discovered that technique could only go so far; my graduate studies instilled within me a desire for something more out of art, some meaning beyond surface application.

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Early on in my graduate studies I hit a roadblock. I was struggling with my art, with my subjects and ideas. I was lost and almost paralyzed by creative doubt.

The most profound advice I keep with me I received from one of my graduate studies professors, Deborah Rockman. She’s a strong mentor, has a powerful mind, and is a fierce friend as well as a deeply moving artist. Early on in my graduate studies I hit a roadblock. I was struggling with my art, with my subjects and ideas. I was lost and almost paralyzed by creative doubt. She advised me quite simply to ‘Draw what you know’. That was a stunning revelation, and it was like a fog had dissipated. I repeat it to myself every day like a mantra before I begin the day’s work.

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This creates a conundrum: attempts to remember specific events in their entirety are colored by a hind-sighted reaction to the memory, causing a distortion.

This creates a conundrum: attempts to remember specific events in their entirety are colored by a hind-sighted reaction to the memory, causing a distortion. Our reactions are emotionally based, immediately altering the truth of the occasion, person or setting. The mind splinters these events and pieces together only bits of fragmented truths coupled with emotional distortions. The images I create in paint and charcoal manifest this idea of splintering and fragmentation; I’m attempting to visualize my own memory perceptions.

I’m striving for the optical experience you have in the brief micro-moments before your eyes fully adjust and focus after you wake up from a night’s rest.

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You’ve got to put in the time and pay your dues if you want things to happen for you.

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Damian Goidich. “They Said They Were My Friends”.
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“Create and Destroy” series

There’s a distinct level of uncomfortableness in these works, a rawness I hadn’t anticipated but contributes significantly to their reception and understanding.

There’s a distinct level of uncomfortableness in these works, a rawness I hadn’t anticipated but contributes significantly to their reception and understanding. This was in 2010–2011, and if you compare the series to my output before those years, it’s a pretty obvious shift in content and visual presentation.

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“Boxed In” series.
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As I grow older, my concepts are becoming more complex, more emotionally driven, and working in a representational style does not always effectively communicate my ideas.

It also has to do with a maturity of artistic appreciation, of looking to alternative forms of art I have not explored before. Lately I have become very intrigued by outsider/lowbrow/pop surrealistic art; it’s a form of direct, uninhibited expression, and the aggressive use of materials and unconventional ideas fascinates me. I can see aspects of this working its way into my art down the road.

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I believe every artist goes through an occasional dry spell or period of uncertainty. It’s natural; we are not machines that spit out a drawing or painting on command.

While I think it’s a universal experience among artists, how you overcome these obstacles is entirely personal. There are some artists who advocate pushing through by continuing to draw or paint with no clear goal in mind, that the act of creative exploration will spark a new idea or lay the foundation for a new direction. Others take this down time to enter a fallow period, a time of introspection and perhaps a time to focus on other aspects of their lives. When I hit a creative roadblock I tend to use my time reading books or papers on art history or art criticism. I find these subjects often help me measure my own art within the context of Art’s expansive history and lead to a deeper understanding of its place and perhaps a new direction. I will also delve into fiction — mostly period piece novels or Victorian Gothic horror short stories — as sources for inspiration.

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Get your work out there in some way, whether through shows, social media, community volunteering — whatever it takes to make your art up front and visible to the world.

I also recommend developing a social media presence across multiple platforms and engage directly with your audience, especially when it comes to replying to comments or direct messages. Each person you correspond with is a potential buyer of your work, so maintaining communication is critical. But also be aware of scams or deceptive people who want to take advantage of you and your work for their own agenda. When you get suckered the first time it subsequently becomes easier to sniff out who’s being truthful and who’s attempting to pull one over on you.

Ten years I’ll never get back. […] I’m trying to make up for lost time.

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