A Daily Dose of Death

What Methadone is really doing to addicts who seek recovery.

Photo by Chaz McGregor on Unsplash

Methadone does not stop addiction. It stops illegal activity in the addict who previously aimed to get high and medicates a world of internal dilemmas, rather than lifting the addict out of the addict mindset and life.

The door slams, loudly. Repeatedly. They go in and they go out and then in and then out and in and out…and in and out.


The controversy

I view this scene as a mother…not as a nurse and I am absolutely appalled that these people are being dosed, but are not being “treated.”


One Example of Our Experience with Ignorance/Prejudice in the Medical Community

Most of these patients at this local South Austin clinic are given Methadone to treat their heroin addiction.

A Repetitive Dilemma for the Addict

The clinic administers both the morning and evening doses of prescribed medications, specifically Methadone, at the same time each morning to the patients. No evening dose is made available, except on weekends, and so both doses are given at once.


No Kind of Consolation

And yet, despite these realities, it with great sadness that I must say…as a mother and a nursing professional…if Methadone keeps our sweet children and our struggling parents and our worn-out elders from dying from an opioid overdose…I have to advocate it, but ONLY for its temporary administration.

Methadone does not stop addiction. It stops illegal activity in the addict aimed at getting high and medicating a world of internal dilemmas, rather than lifting the addict out of the addict mindset and life.


Promoting True Healing

Despite the common allegation that Methadone maintenance is different for everyone and so some have to take it for years or for life…this theory of “treatment” is not acceptable. It is not safe and its effects are not congruent with normalcy.

Some Perspectives and Experiences of Addicts

Russell Brand, a recovering heroin addict, and advocate for abstinence has something to say about Methadone use.

This idea of the lifelong need to medicate yourself with the closest thing to the opiate killing you is just not a rational or acceptable one.

Photo by niu niu on Unsplash

Barriers and Challenges to the Pursuit of Recovery

I am writing this piece as I want to expose the sordid facets of “sobriety,” and “recovery” that addicts who want to get better must endure achieving safety, security, and a drug-free place in their lives.

Summarizing a Need for Change in Longterm Methadone “Treatment”

Addiction is a health problem, not a personality/character problem. However, there are major differences in treating traditionally recognized diagnoses with lifelong medications and treating opioid addiction with very longstanding or lifelong doses of Methadone.


Publishous

Discover tomorrow’s bestsellers today. You'll say you knew them when.

Christina Vaughn: Pedi/NICU Nurse freelance writer

Written by

Nurse. Writer: medical, family, addiction and wellness. See my blog flourishmedicinehealthandaddiction.com to subscribe to frequent posts on the above and more.

Publishous

Discover tomorrow’s bestsellers today. You'll say you knew them when.

Welcome to a place where words matter. On Medium, smart voices and original ideas take center stage - with no ads in sight. Watch
Follow all the topics you care about, and we’ll deliver the best stories for you to your homepage and inbox. Explore
Get unlimited access to the best stories on Medium — and support writers while you’re at it. Just $5/month. Upgrade