How Can God Let Me See Through My Painting?

A look at a 33 dot Challenge in Art

Janis Cox
Mar 7, 2018 · 4 min read

Once again I challenged myself with 33 dots on a page. I prayerfully put 33 random dots on a page with my eyes closed. Then I join the dots without crossing any lines.

What will I be able to see this time?

It’s not easy but I ask God — what it is this week that you want to explain to me? I turned the page around and round. I finally settled with this view.

What do you see?

This week I had the pleasure of a visit from my sister-in-law. We did some walking around the Riparian Water Reserve in Gilbert, Arizona. We had our little dog, Snowball, with us.

My sister-in-law loves taking pictures. So I wandered and she shot 100 pictures. She and Snowball have one thing in common and that’s rabbits. They both love rabbits. But Snowball likes to chase them and my sister-in-law wants them to stay still. I would hold our little dog back while she took some great pictures.

I guess rabbits were on my mind when I looked at my 33 dots because this is what I saw.

A rabbit emerged from the 33 random dots.

Now I have a rabbit picture and of course Easter is coming in a few weeks so my mind went to the Easter Bunny and Easter Eggs.

I have questioned this custom before. In fact I wrote about Satan’s letter stating that children were taken away from the true meaning of Easter by the Easter Bunny.

But I’ve changed my mind since reading about the history of these customs.

There doesn’t seem to be much consistency in opinions as folklore has spread down through the ages. It seems, if I remember correctly from my reading, that the egg has always been an analogy of the tomb and new life. I remember teaching that in Sunday School.

But the rabbit? How did he fit into this?

In the 16th Century Protestant Germans immigrated to the States. They brought with them the tale of the Oschter Haws, or Easter Hare. The history is cloudy of where he came from but the tradition spread across North America. He is an egg-laying rabbit that brings smiles to children as he delivers coloured Easter eggs on Easter. Rabbits also are known for creating more rabbits — and that’s a sign of new life.

And Jesus brought us life.

I’m leaving it there, because really I think if we teach the power of the resurrection of Jesus to children, the fun of the Easter bunny won’t encroach on the real meaning of what really happened at Easter.

I don’t want arguments.

You are free to have your opinions but God showed me the rabbit and it’s Easter.

The problem is that first we have to get through Lent — which can be tough (I’m doing 2 studies right now and always find the pain of Lent (especially week 4 of the study reading “The Soldier Who Killed a King” by David Kitz) as hard to fathom.

God reminds me that we will go through tough times in life. Lent reminds me of this.

Easter

There is light at the end of the journey. When we keep our eyes fixed on Jesus with the hope and grace that He gives us there will be Easter.

“fixing our eyes on Jesus, the pioneer and perfecter of faith. For the joy set before him he endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God (Hebrews 12:2, NIV).”

And to make you feel the power of the Cross please listen to Christ Alone by Keith Getty and Kristyn Getty. We sang this on Sunday and all the sorrows of Lent were washed away. I saw Easter.

This is day 18 of a 30 day writing challenge with Tom Kuegler. Check out his post about this challenge. My Powerful 1 Hour Routine for Quick Success on Medium.

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Janis Cox

Written by

Janis Cox

Creativity Spiritual Catalyst. Author and Illustrator. Christ Follower. FB group for artists and writers. Free Bible Art Course. https://linktr.ee/janis_cox

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