Does God Use a Helicopter to Take Children to Heaven?

I thought my situation was bad; I didn’t know how much worse it was for others

Roger A. Reid, Ph.D.
Publishous
Published in
6 min readMay 14, 2024

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Photo by Niklas Bischop on Unsplash

There are many sights and sounds inside a hospital. Fortunately, most of us rarely see the interior of these places.

In my case, I’ve been extremely lucky. My recent stay in the cardiac unit of St. Joseph’s Hospital in Tampa is the first time I’ve ever needed such an extreme level of medical care.

But this article isn’t about me.

It’s about the others — the sudden strangers you meet simply because you’re in the same place at the same time.

Birds of a feather, peas in a pod, that sort of thing.

At first, it’s easy to ignore them. Not on purpose, but because you’re focused on your own situation, your own problems. Emergency rooms were not designed to promote social interaction. Yes, you see the other folks, but there’s an unspoken agreement that governs our actions in a critical care unit . . .

I can’t chat right now, and neither can you. So let’s suspend the normal greeting until later, when we have a better handle on what’s going on with our health.

A few hours pass. Those with treatable conditions are stabilized and sent home.

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Roger A. Reid, Ph.D.
Publishous

Author of “Better Mondays”|Host of Success Point 360 Podcast|Tips & strategies on personal development-work-productivity-careers-life | https://RogerReid.com