Nancy Pelosi: 30 Years an AIDS Advocate

The Democratic House Minority Leader is scheduled to appear on RuPaul’s Drag Race, yet younger generations may be unaware of her decades-long advocacy for persons living with HIV/AIDS.

“It made me think of my grandmothers and great-grandmothers,” he would later write. “It evoked images of pioneer women making camp by the Conestoga wagons. Or African slaves in the South, hoarding scraps of fabric from the master’s house. It spoke of cast-offs, discarded remnants, different colors and textures, sewn together to create something beautiful and useful and warm. Comforters” (OUT).

Jones and his friends began making 4-by-6-foot quilt panels in their backyards, determined to unveil their creation on the National Mall at the October 1987 Second National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights.

“HIV has proven to be a tenacious and resourceful virus, ever mutating to escape our destruction of it. We must be equally tenacious and resourceful to at long last banish HIV to the dustbin of history. We cannot take our progress for granted — we must continue to act with urgency, vigilance, and compassion.”

Pelosi has acted in just such a way for three decades, and we would do well to follow her lead, lest the horrors of the past return to reinfect the present.

Queer History For the People

QHFTP aims to make LGBTQ history and culture available, and accessible, to all. We cannot work effectively for change unless we know where we've been and the history of those made invisible by mainstream narratives.

Jeffry J. Iovannone

Written by

Scholar-activist; Queer thinker; Primary writer for Queer History for the People; Columnist for Th-Ink Queerly. E-mail: QueerHistoryFTP@gmail.com

Queer History For the People

QHFTP aims to make LGBTQ history and culture available, and accessible, to all. We cannot work effectively for change unless we know where we've been and the history of those made invisible by mainstream narratives.