Rural County Galway, Ireland in January 2016.

Local language / global network

Designing mobile technology for indigenous and minority language users

Derek Lackaff
Sep 26, 2016 · 10 min read
Percentage of people who speak Irish daily outside the education system, 2011 Census. By SkateTier CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Minority Language Computerization

“The broader and more serious implications are for the language as it is used in daily life. Technology is moving towards AI and speech-controlled applications, and the companies developing it do not see preserving languages spoken by few as their responsibility. When the day comes that we have to speak to our refrigerators in English (which I believe is not far in the future), Icelandic will retreat very fast.”

Never Alone (Kisima Ingitchuna) is a game based on the storytelling tradition of the Iñupiat people.

Mobile eats the world

Sure beats button mashing on a feature phone.

How does Irish go mobile?

Technological factors

Cultural contexts

Linguistic requirements

Teresa Lynn, a researcher with the ADAPT Centre, gives a TEDx talk on Irish and social media.

r12n: technology and language revitalization

r12n features stories on innovative uses of technology in the race to revitalize the world’s indigenous, endangered, and minoritized languages.

Derek Lackaff

Written by

civic technology | languages of few speakers | social and antisocial media | @EloniMedia faculty

r12n: technology and language revitalization

r12n features stories on innovative uses of technology in the race to revitalize the world’s indigenous, endangered, and minoritized languages.