In Conversation with the winners of the 2017 Getty Instagram Grant

This year the Getty Instagram Grant was awarded to Nina Robinson, Isadora Kosofsky, and Saumya Khandelwa. The grant awards $10,000 to three emerging talents, who use Instagram to share stories from underrepresented communities. Re-Picture editor Danielle Villasana speaks with each them about their projects, passions, and what’s up next.

Danielle Villasana
Nov 24, 2017 · 12 min read

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Aunt Jean stands underneath a tree next to grandma’s house, gazing up at the sky, in Dalark, Arkansas. Photograph by Nina Robinson, @ninarobinsonnyc, @arkansasfamilyalbum
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Clockwise from top: 1) Aunt Jean stares off, admiring the view of a small hidden lake in Joan, Arkansas. 2) Aunt Betty tapes up pages in grandma’s bible in Dalark, Arkansas. It was storming hard the night before, grandma always has her bible open to Luke 8:22–25 during bad weather. 3) Grandma’s favorite chair sits in the corner of her room, pillow still mushed down, Dalark, Arkansas. 4) The funeral director helps Rev. Craig remove grandma from aunt Betty’s home, into the back of the hearse. Photographs by Nina Robinson, @ninarobinsonnyc, @arkansasfamilyalbum
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From left: 1) “Our too-young and too-new America, lusty because it is lonely, aggressive because it is afraid, insists upon seeing the world in terms of good and bad, the holy and the evil, the high and the low, the white and the black; our America is frightened of fact, of history, of processes, of necessity. It hugs the easy way of damning those whom it cannot understand, of excluding those who look different, and it salves its conscience with a self-draped cloak of righteousness.” — Richard Wright, Black Boy 2) Every time I see this photograph I’m reminded of the celebration of beauty within us — our hair, our skin, our magic. When we’re younger, we often lose sight of those natural parts of us that we didn’t think were beautiful to begin with. We question our identity, our self-worth and where we fit into this world. Then one day, we wake up. In this image, cousin Jayla gets her hair done by her mother before a birthday party. Photographs by Nina Robinson, @ninarobinsonnyc, @arkansasfamilyalbum
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Grandma was in excruciating pain and could barely breathe but asked to hold my hand and for me to pray over her. This was the second night of my arrival, in Dalark, Arkansas. Photograph by Nina Robinson, @ninarobinsonnyc, @arkansasfamilyalbum
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Clockwise from top: 1) Brothers Vinny, 15, and David, 21, tease each other while Vinny showers after David’s release from jail. 2) Vinny, 13, prays in his cell at the juvenile detention center in Albuquerque, NM, where he is held for stabbing the man who was assaulting his mother. Vinny confides, “When my mom was being beat up, I was so scared. I wanted to defend my mom. I’m tired of seeing my mom get hurt.” 3) Vinny, 13, and his mom, Eve, recline on a blanket in Vinny’s aunt’s backyard during an organized family visit. After his release from juvenile detention, Vinny was court ordered to live with his paternal aunt three hours away from his family in Albuquerque. “I died when I lost my son,” says Eve. Photographs by Isadora Kosofsky, @isadorakosofsky
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From left: 1) With her arms around his neck, Jeanie looks at Will and smiles while Adina looks at them as they all loiter at the bus stop in Los Angeles, California. Image from my long-term series entitled “Senior Love Triangle,” which shadows Jeanie, 81, Will, 84, and Adina, age 91, who are romantically entwined. 2) William, 84, looks down at one of his girlfriend’s, Jeanie, from his apartment window at night in Los Angeles, California; Will watches Jeanie as she paces and tries to figure out how she will return to her retirement home after they have had a fight. Photographs by Isadora Kosofsky, @isadorakosofsky
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Amber closes her eyes during an early morning bus ride to the Hernando Correctional Institution in Brooksville, FL, where her grandmother, Rebecca, is incarcerated for burglary. “We are going to the prison so my mom did my hair,” says Amber, 7. “I have fun playing games and drawing when we get there.” Both of Amber’s maternal grandparents are incarcerated for separate offenses. “I know my parents as parents who have been in and out of the system. It has been my example. My husband and I have turned our lives around but that is so complicated and I understand that she has a harder time getting out of the cycle. Drugs have been the problem behind all of it,” Sabrina, Amber’s mom, confides. “Still My Mother, Still My Father” is a photo series that documents bonding meetings between children and their incarcerated mothers and fathers at 12 prisons in Florida. More than 2.7 million children in the U.S. have an incarcerated parent, and approximately 10 million children have experienced parental incarceration at some point in their lives. Photograph by Isadora Kosofsky, @isadorakosofsky

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Muskaan, 14, marries a 21-year-old man, during wedding festivities. Photograph by Saumya Khandelwal, @khandelwal_saumya
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Left to right, from top: 1) Muskaan, 14, who is marrying a 21-year-old man, loves to wear a sari and is glad that she is getting a chance to wear it on her wedding. She is excited to see all her friends come to her house for the occasion. She has no definitive answer when asked about how she feels about her wedding. 2 & 3) Moments during Muskaan’s wedding. 4) Anjani, 16, sits inside her husband’s house during the Gauna ceremony, during which the bride typically comes to live at the husband’s house and brings a dowry. Relatives also visit to meet the bride. In villages like Sarka Baraau, the bride continues to live with her parents until her Gauna, after which she can then start living with her husband. Photographs by Saumya Khandelwal, @khandelwal_saumya
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Tattoos on the hands of Sheela and Sanju Sonkar are depictions of their marital status. Every woman who moves to her in-laws home after marriage must receive this tattoo. Without this, the husband’s family will not even accept a glass of water from her. Photograph by Saumya Khandelwal, @khandelwal_saumya



Re-Picture

We are creating new generations of storytellers and…

Thanks to Elie Gardner

Danielle Villasana

Written by

Independent Photojournalist focusing on human rights, women, identity, and health worldwide. Community Team at The Everyday Projects, @EverydayEverywhere.

Re-Picture

We are creating new generations of storytellers and audiences that recognize the need for multiple perspectives in portraying the cultures that define us. Re-Picture is an online publication of The Everyday Projects.

Danielle Villasana

Written by

Independent Photojournalist focusing on human rights, women, identity, and health worldwide. Community Team at The Everyday Projects, @EverydayEverywhere.

Re-Picture

We are creating new generations of storytellers and audiences that recognize the need for multiple perspectives in portraying the cultures that define us. Re-Picture is an online publication of The Everyday Projects.

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