Courtney Brown’s Scientific Remote Viewing (SRV), Part 5: How do ideograms work?

Monad Mantis
Oct 25, 2020 · 7 min read

“While the traditional model of psychiatry and psychoanalysis is strictly personalistic and biographical, modern consciousness research has added new levels, realms, and dimensions and shows the human psyche as being essentially commensurate with the whole universe and all of existence” (Stanislav Grof).

Courtney Brown’s Scientific Remote Viewing (SRV), Part 5: How do ideograms work?
Courtney Brown’s Scientific Remote Viewing (SRV), Part 5: How do ideograms work?

It is tempting to see the use of ideograms as a vacuous formality that can easily be dispensed with. But according to the theory underlying its functionality within the SRV framework, this is not true. Indeed, the causal mechanism that makes the use of ideograms so effective, as Dr. Courtney Brown explains, has crucially to do with how and why psychic ability is even possible for humans in the first place.

As we have seen, the capacity to remote view appears to necessarily presuppose a composite understanding of the human being that includes, at the very least, an immaterial soul and a material body. For Courtney, the usefulness of ideograms has to do with the nature of the connection between the soul or subspace aspect of consciousness and the electrochemical, physical, and biological brain. Courtney compares the interface mechanism between the subspace aspect and the lower self or conscious ego to a “bus,” which in compute architecture, functions as a kind of data highway or communication system that transfers data between components inside of a computer, including components such as wires, optical fibers, and software.

Think of the brain as a supercomputer and the soul as a kind of omniscient being. The brain and the body are both animated by the soul but the bus that connects the two is extremely primitive and so the perceptual abilities of the brain are very limited. In other words, the brain is genetically hardwired to understand a set of protocols that is extremely contracted and limited compared to what the subspace aspect itself is capable of. In the “3D” realm, to use language commonly used in New Age thought (and this language may or may not be precise), we have a limited set of categories we use to navigate these dimensions because the dimension we inhabit is itself limiting by nature. We are preoccupied, from an evolutionary perspective, with survival and reproductive success and our access to higher states of mind is comparatively limited and only attained with great effort.

The subspace aspect is not able to transfer information very quickly or effectively so we only receive bits of pieces that we must then cobble together into coherent stories. It is like trying to piece together an ordinary, linear narrative from a collage. The ideogram is the form of symbolization that is most ideal for this task because it is the closest representation to the actual target that we have in the session and it is able to “sneak” information from the subspace aspect to the conscious mind by jotting the representations down very quickly before the conscious mind and its analytic and discursive faculties have the opportunity to intervene and impose their own fabricated story about what is being perceived. Basically, through remote viewing, the ideogram is the means of information and symbol transmission that gives the subspace mind the most control over our perception of reality, even if only for a brief moment, whereas we are normally captive to the 3D realm.

Thus, the reason is it is so important to put the pen on the paper as soon as possible after hearing writing the last digits of the coordinate is because this is a kind of aperture or window of opportunity during which our connection with the subspace mind, and its consequent ability to transmit information to the physical brain, is most optimal since our ordinary analytic and discursive mode of conscious thought is temporarily suspended. Indeed, this is why it is important to simply trust the subspace aspect without consciously ruminating on results; the subspace aspect needs this very brief window of opportunity to tell us what is actually going on before the domineering conscious ego reintroduces its analytic and discursive mode of perception back onto the scene and reasserts its dominion over the 3D realm, which it sees as its rightful inheritance.

These ideograms are thus short pieces of information that are transferred from the subspace aspect and are the means by which it is able to briefly sneak symbolic information into our realm while the ego is momentarily distracted, like a stealthy ninja. What implications does it have for the nature of reality and of the universe in general? Although in many respects we can only speculate, I believe that the reality of remote viewing suggests the plausibility of either Advaita or Vishishtadvaita models of the universe in Hinduism. From this perspective, it would seem that we are either receiving bits of information from an omniscient Oneness to which we as individuals are ultimately reducible (Advaita), or we are irreducibly individuated as eternal souls embedded within such a Oneness, and by virtue of this embeddedness, we have access to all conceivable information from this Oneness.

Different philosophers and theologians have articulated the relationship of the physical body and brain to subtler bodies on subtler planes in various, typically speculative, ways. Hinduism, for example, is well-known for its Three Bodies doctrine, which articulates the human person in terms of the fundamentally causal body, astral body, and then the gross or coarse human body. However, there are several variations of these ideas and some Yogis have posited a greater number of subtle bodies. Theosophists and Rosicrucians have likewise speculated about various hierarchies of bodies, with greater or lesser degrees of subtly or materiality.

But how do we explain this scientifically? The psychological scientist Karl Pribram and the physicist David Bohm both independently articulated theoretical frameworks that would later be synthesized in a fruitful manner that has the potential to explain scientifically, rather than philosophically or theologically, how all of these ideas hang together and how and why remote viewing is possible. Pribram’s trajectory towards his relevant conclusions began when he realized that the concept of the “engram,” according to which specific parts of the brain house specific memories, could not possibly be coherent because mice could remember how to navigate mazes even with significant parts of their brains removed, and humans with significant parts of their brains removed did not necessarily endure large gaps of missing memory, even if retention could be impaired to a degree. This led him to become skeptical of the idea that the brain is the ultimate seat of consciousness.

Nevertheless, Pribram had a hard time figuring out how memory was possible, in light of this, until he discovered the concept of the hologram. What makes holography possible is the concept of interference, in which there is a crisscrossing pattern that occurs when two or more waves ripple through one another. Any wavelike phenomena can result in such an interference pattern. Laser light is very pure and coherent and it is therefore very good at creating such interference patterns. Such holograms result when a laser is split into two beams, with the first beam bouncing off the object to be photographed and the second beam allowed to collide with the reflected light of the first. This results in an interference pattern recorded on a piece of film. When another laser is shined through the film, a 3D image of the original object reappears.

Bizarrely, each part of the hologram retains the entirety of the image. Similarly, in remote viewing, each and every part of reality is accessible from each and every part, in a manner reminiscent of a hologram. More specifically, Pribram came up with the analogous idea that every part of the brain had access to every memory. Indeed, David Bohm, whose work contributed the other half of the Pribram-Bohm holonomic theory of mind (the idea that the mind is structured in a way that resembles lawlike tendencies associated with holograms) eventually became convinced that the entire universe was a hologram. Bohm helped complete Pribram’s picture by arguing that everything in the universe is connected to everything else (as Jan Harzan was once told by Ben Rich of Lockheed, ESP works because all points in spacetime are connected to one another).

What intrigued Bohm about the concept of the hologram and its relevance to his intuitions about the interconnectedness of all things was the fact that the holographic image on the film itself appeared disordered until a laser was shown on it in an appropriate way, resulting in the materialization of the recorded 3D image. This led Bohm to the idea that within apparent disorder there is order “enfolded” within it. Indeed, for Bohm, the universe, as an apparently disordered whole, actually has the order of all of its points in space-time enfolded within it, and the spatiotemporal world is the unfolding of this order from within the apparent disorder. Bohm would ultimately conclude that it is absurd to think of the universe as composed of parts at all. Separateness, locality, spatiotemporal division, and individuation, in his mind, are all ultimately illusions, and the relevance of this idea to remote viewers ought to be immediately obvious. Most intriguingly, Bohm believed that it was possible to engage in a kind of quantum tunneling and acquire information from the all-pervasive “implicate order” which houses all information. I believe that this is a hypothesized mechanism that may be of interest to future researchers in remote viewing and psi phenomena in general.

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Monad Mantis

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Experienced psychology writer and practitioner of psi abilities. Looking forward to contributing to a worldwide awakening to the reality of psi phenomena.

Remote Viewing Community Magazine

Explore the woo. A place to share your stories, give advice and learn the art of remote viewing: CRV, ARV, and ERV. Tom Delonge, we are UFO friendly!