America’s Use of the Glorious Revolution

Rebecca Graf
Apr 5 · 3 min read
https://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/HistoryofEngland/The-Glorious-Revolution-1688/

Less than a hundred years after the Glorious Revolution, the American colonists felt dissatisfied with how they were ruled. The disgruntled feelings were not based on religious beliefs this time. It was anger on acts imposed by the monarchy and the Parliament that were considered unfair by the colonists.

They wanted new leadership and followed the example of the English Parliament of 1688. When the masses aren’t satisfied, they look to change it. So much of history shows this.

The Glorious Revolution

Let’s start by exploring what the Glorious Revolution was. History.com gives a perfection description:

The Glorious Revolution, also called “The Revolution of 1688” and “The Bloodless Revolution,” took place from 1688 to 1689 in England. It involved the overthrow of the Catholic king James II, who was replaced by his Protestant daughter Mary and her Dutch husband, William of Orange. Motives for the revolution were complex and included both political and religious concerns. The event ultimately changed how England was governed, giving Parliament more power over the monarchy and planting seeds for the beginnings of a political democracy. (https://www.history.com/topics/british-history/glorious-revolution)

England had had enough with the religious politics that caused them too much pain. This relief flowed over to the colonies where they were not persecuted for their non Catholic ways.

Original Intent

The American colonists did not begin with the intention of separating from the empire. In fact, they “felt great pride in the empire, derived great economic benefits from trading within its network, and dreaded the death and destruction of a civil war.” The colonists were just protesting the taxes and treatments they looked at as being unfair. This revolution did lead to bloodshed and separation from the empire unlike the Glorious Revolution.

British Parliament created a peaceful revolution with the end result in their favor. They had the new monarchs sign the Bill of Rights which limited the power of the king and protected Parliament. A new ruler and expanded rights were what Parliament obtained from the Glorious Revolution. They saw a situation where they did not receive ‘fair’ treatment and sought a way to remedy it. Everything fell into place for it to be a mainly peaceful revolt as King James cowardly fled and stayed in France. Their relief came with a degree of peaceful actions.

Peaceful

In 1688, the English Parliament sought relief from the ‘unfair’ treatment of Anglicans in England which led to the Glorious Revolution. The American colonists of 1776 followed their example, but soon discovered that not all revolutions can avoid blood and not all monarchs are cowards. It was okay for the British people back in the motherland to demand things and get what they what. That was acceptable. The colonists didn’t seem to have the same rights though they were British citizens.

Ironically, the very Parliament that initiated the Glorious Revolution was part of the very entity that the American revolted against due to unfair treatment. They had no idea what they were inspiring and how it would be the first snowball in a empire landslide. They got what they wanted but at a future expense.

Sources:

“England in the 17th Century: Summary.” Glorious Revolution. http://faculty.ucc.edu/egh-damerow/glorious_revolution.html. accessed April 8, 2011.

“James II.” The Official Website of the British Monarcy. http://www.royal.gov.uk/ HistoryoftheMonarchy/KingsandQueensoftheUnitedKingdom/TheStuarts/JamesII.aspx., accessed April 9, 2011.

Taylor, Alan. American Colonies: The Settling of North America. New York: Penguin, 2000.

Thackeray, Frank W. and John E. Findling. Events That Changed America Through the Seventeenth Century. Westport: Greenwood Press, 2000.

“The Glorious Revolution and the English Bill of Rights.” http://www.international.ucla.edu/ media/files/The%20Glorious%20Revolution%20and%20the%20English%20Bill%20of%20Rights.pdf. accessed April 8, 2011.

Rebecca Graf

Written by

Writer for ten years, lover of education, and degrees in business, history, and English. Striving to become a Renassiance woman. www.writerrebeccagraf.com

Renaissance Men and Women

Learn to expand your knowledge and your experience. Become a modern day Renaissance. We are dedicated to pushing ourselves and becoming well-rounded. Want to be a writer? Contact me at writingwithsuccess@gmail.com

Rebecca Graf

Written by

Writer for ten years, lover of education, and degrees in business, history, and English. Striving to become a Renassiance woman. www.writerrebeccagraf.com

Renaissance Men and Women

Learn to expand your knowledge and your experience. Become a modern day Renaissance. We are dedicated to pushing ourselves and becoming well-rounded. Want to be a writer? Contact me at writingwithsuccess@gmail.com

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