2113: Stories Inspired By the Music of Rush by Kevin J. Anderson and Josh McFetridge, eds. (Review)

ECW Press, 2016

Andy Rooney said, “Writers never retire.” Drummers…well, it happens and it’s not always voluntary. We know Neil Peart can’t rock the solos forever, short of having bionic arms installed (don’t think somebody hasn’t suggested it), and if you’ve read recent interviews you know what’s on his mind. Family. Writing. Somewhere he’s said he hoped to adapt Clockwork Angels the novel to film. So yeah, he’s not going anywhere in a sense.

While I didn’t love the Clockwork Angels novel, I think there’s strong potential in a film. Tighten the story and give it to right director, and I’ll go see it. I haven’t yet read the followup, because to be honest 2113 intrigued me more. Multi-author anthologies, for me, are a mixed bag in terms of quality, but this being a collection of stories — 16 of which are inspired by Rush songs — proved too tempting to resist.

Of the 18 authors included in the book, I’ve read three prior, including Kevin J. Anderson and Mercedes Lackey (I’d read somewhere she based the character Dirk from the Valdemar novels on Geddy Lee). Most die-hard fans have searched the Internet to read “A Nice Morning Drive” by Richard S. Foster, which inspired Neil to write “Dead Barchetta.” It is part of this collection, and Fritz Leiber’s “Gonna Roll the Bones” is the other reprint.

So we have 18 stories, each connected to a specific Rush song. The cover and roster suggest all science fiction, and you’ll find everything from hard SF to futuristic drama here, but 2113 also showcases some paranormal mystery and noir. For the most part, Easter eggs of Rush lyrics are scarce — which suits me fine. The stories flow nicely, much like in Rush albums where the individual songs connect to form an all-encompassing concept.

Highlights for me in 2113 include:

“On the Fringes of the Fractal” by Greg Van Eekhout — Futuristic YA about loyalty and friendship, a willingness to sacrifice social standing for a friend.

“A Patch of Blue” by Ron Collins — Another theme of “deviating from the norm,” as one Rush song goes, where creators in two different realms take similar paths for what they believe is right.

“The Burning Times, V2.0” by Brian Hodge — Like Fahrenheit 451 crossed with Harry Potter; a young fights censorship and as a result has to save himself.

“The Digital Kid” by Michael Z. Williamson — A dreamer’s journey to overcome disability.

“Some Are Born to Save the World” by Mark Leslie — The story of a superhero’s mortality.

I won’t reveal which songs inspired which stories. As noted in the book’s introduction, one doesn’t need to be familiar with Rush’s music to enjoy the book. That the majority of the contributing authors have backgrounds in SFF keep the stories cohesive. A fair number of Rush fans I know enjoyed Clockwork Angels, but I think they will appreciate this book as much, if not more.

My only nitpick with this collection: only one female author in the bunch. If the boys sanction this as a franchise, perhaps 2114 could feature a few more women writers. Lady Rush fans do exist.

ARC of book received by publisher for review.

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