The Daily Plan Bar

Mike Rohde
Dec 27, 2016 · 5 min read
A sample Daily Plan Bar in my Leuchtturm dot-grid notebook.

What is the Daily Plan Bar?

My inspiration: Bill Westerman’s daily planning bar from 2006.

Building the Daily Plan Bar

The Process in Detail

I use a bright orange or other bright color flair marker to contrast to the black used for the details.
Create the bar on the right side of the page, for right-hand pages.
Count off 4 grid, then create a horizontal line, to represent an hour of time.
The margin to the left (or right) of the Plan Bar provides space for the hour indicators.
Here’s a block of time marked with an angled hatch and label.

Blocking out time for design or other creative work, instead of leaving these as open space, encourages me to protect and fight for my focused work time.

You can just use the squares needed to represent time. Email is a 30 minute time block.

For meetings I’ll include people’s names, locations, room numbers, phone numbers — whatever helps me define the time block.

Here I’m adding detail to my blocks, like Shah Jee’s for lunch, or a room for the Stakeholder Meeting.
Adding a 30 minute impromptu co-piloting design meeting to my plan.
This is how I cancel and annotate a cancelled meeting.
Stars help me see the most important tasks for the day.
A completed page, featuring the Daily Plan Bar, tasks, notes and an explanatory sketchnote of a Moka Pot.

Rohdesign

Bestselling author Mike Rohde writes about sketchnoting, design, and visual thinking.

Mike Rohde

Written by

Designer. Bestselling author of The Sketchnote Handbook The Sketchnote Workbook. Illustrator of REWORK, REMOTE, $100 Startup. Founder of Sketchnote Army.

Rohdesign

Rohdesign

Bestselling author Mike Rohde writes about sketchnoting, design, and visual thinking.