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Map of the State of Texas, 1879

Due to its large size, reproductions of the Pressler-Langermann map are printed at 58.5” x 60.7”, 57% of the original.
Charles W. Pressler and A.B. Langermann, Map of the State of Texas, Austin, TX: Texas General Land Office, 1879, Map #16973, Map Collection, Archives and Records Program, Texas General Land Office, Austin, TX.
The title block of the map indicates the sources from which the map was drawn, including records on file in the General Land Office.
The Galveston Daily News noted the release of Pressler and Langermann’s map in their May 21, 1879 edition. The Galveston Daily News. (Galveston, Tex.), Vol. 38, №50, Ed. 1 Wednesday, May 21, 1879, newspaper, May 21, 1879; (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth464267/:accessed October 4, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; crediting Abilene Library Consortium.
The route of the Texas and Pacific Railroad stretched across Texas.
Towns and cities were named throughout Texas, with the designation “P.O.” following those with post offices.
Roads are represented by a double line, and the letter “R” indicates ranches.
Railroad company land was usually surveyed in large blocks, with a checkerboard pattern displayed by alternating company and state surveys.
[left] Greer County was ceded to the United States after it was determined that the south fork of the Red River formed Texas’s true northern border. [right] Encinal County, never fully established, became part of neighboring Webb County.
A Table of Counties provides detailed information on each county, including some defunct counties.
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Texas General Land Office

Official Account for the Texas General Land Office | Follow Commissioner George P. Bush on Twitter at @georgepbush. www.txglo.org