Johann Baptiste Homann, [Regni Mexicani seu Novae Hispaniae], Nuremberg: Homann, 1720, Map #93408, Map Collection, Archives and Records Program, Texas General Land Office, Austin, TX.

Regni Mexicani seu Novae Hispaniæ, Ludovicianæ, N. Angliæ, Carolinæ, Virginiæ, et Pennsylvaniæ, 1720

[Kingdom of Mexico, or New Spain, Louisiana, New England, Carolina, Virginia and Pennsylvania, 1720]

Detail of gold mining operations and exchanges between indigenous peoples and Europeans.

Johann Baptist Homann’s decorative map, based on the landmark map of Mexico and Florida by Guillaume de L’Isle (Delisle), covers the principal centers of European control in North America prior to the Treaty of Utrecht.

Drawn from information provided by French explorers, the map accurately portrays the mouth of the Mississippi River and the Great Lakes Region. It is also filled with place names in Latin, French, English and Spanish; indigenous villages in the lower Mississippi Valley; and, Spanish missions and presidios of the Southwest.

This is the area that would become Texas. Clearly visible is the source of the Rio Grande going into the Rocky Mountains. For the most part, the rivers depicted are fairly accurate.
Detail of the title block of this map.

The map is embellished with a cartouche with two natives, a buffalo head, and other symbols of the region’s natural resources; a battle scene in the Pacific involving Dutch pirate ships; and a large, fully colored engraving of gold mining operations and exchanges between indigenous peoples and Europeans.

Detail of a battle featuring Dutch ships.

A reproduction of this map can be purchased on the GLO website.