Activating the Light You Shine for Others

Into the minds of every person is given an ability to make a difference in the quality of life. Some people believe they are at the mercy of our world, but each of us, consciously or unconsciously, creates the quality of our own world.

Once we become adults, we become fully responsible for our lives. Even as students, we made a choice to be interested in learning, or not. That choice affected the direction of our lives. However, even if you are one who had little interest in school, you can still always change your interests in learning now. Make learning a hobby, then a habit. You’ll be surprised at the difference it will make in your life.

Each of us is given a responsibility to be positive role models, to influence through an attitude of respect, to display a commitment to learning and improvement, to help others to grow and improve. This means being a responsible parent, a teacher, a leader, to set an example of what we know is right.

One person cannot do all things — not even a president or a king, but each of us can do good things — together we can accomplish great things.

Our culture has become selfish. We constantly point fingers at our politicians, expressing that they are responsible for the results of our lives. We expect them to solve and fix all of the problems in our communities, our society, and our world, while we work at our jobs and wait for abundance to fall from the national treasury. We resist paying taxes while complaining about the infrastructure of our roads, cost of education, low pay of our teachers, pollution, or costs for senior care. Too often we take “sides” on the values of public education, immigration, race relations, health issues, homelessness, veterans services, social security, foreign aid, etc., only when they directly affect ourselves and our families. Charity, philanthropy, and giving has become more of what we expect others to do, but not ourselves — we’re too busy, we don’t have the time, we don’t have the money, or it does not affect me and mine.

It begins with a change in attitude. Stop judging what others are doing. Accept responsibility for what YOU can do. Decide it is time to become a leader. Step up and step out to make a difference. Donations of money are good, but donations of time and attention are invaluable. Find a cause that FEEDS YOUR SPIRIT. Even if it’s to give one Saturday a month to a food bank, to become a Big Brother/Big Sister, to visit a senior home or children’s hospital,… make that call to ask, “What can I do to help?”

A person who becomes a leader, must sometimes turn their back on the crowd.

Resist the pitch of the average person to remain like them. Joe Average is not making a difference in the community; he is only criticizing what is wrong with his perception of his world. Become a Thought-Leader. Rise above the influence of Joe Average to sacrifice your passions, ideas and goals — to make a change, to make a difference.

Change may not appear to be easy. But once you have made a positive change, you will realize it was much easier and more rewarding than you anticipated. When you were in grade school, a high-school education appeared to be a long, difficult challenge filled with unknown obstacles! But the path was not so hard, was it? And likely, the day you received your diploma is still a most cherished memory of your achievement.

Winners are made, not born. Embrace your ability to make a difference. Support the advancement, success and happiness of others. Kindness increases the joy of life. Even the return of a smile can raise your spirit. Setting a positive example, encouraging and empowering others is a high!

Our path is brightened by the light we shine for others.

Make a difference. Be the Spark!

Scott Howard

www.ScottHowardSpeaks.com

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