Why Continue Learning?

by Scott Howard

As important as the subjects are, this will not be a discussion about the value of a college education, issues with our public school systems, children’s literacy, or even continued education in your chosen profession. It’s about our personal choice to continue learning beyond our initial education and career.

Continued learning should be a life-long endeavor. Personally, I can not imagine not wanting to read, learn, and grow. The more subjects you have knowledge about, the easier it is to hold a conversation, develop relationships and socialize with a more diverse range of people. Communication and social skills can and will propel a person to the top of their field in almost every profession. Yet, I am often surprised by the perceptions of people, even educated people, who consider it unnecessary to further study anything beyond their own career interests.

The great number of people, who choose to stop learning once their schooling is over, is obvious and it’s disturbing. For many, aside from on-the-job training, or information they hear on radio or television, read very little of any great educational value. Some claim their survival in the School of Life as a badge of knowledge.

Because a school curriculum contains only a fraction of all there is to learn, self-development is crucial. We have libraries across America, filled with FREE valuable information designed to educate, inform, enlighten and improve our lives. If reading is not your thing, audio books make for easy listening. Biographies, history, literature and stimulating stories improve the development of higher learning and language skills. If we are to stay vital, an ongoing education is essential.

While I majored in Art (Illustration and Graphic Design) in college, I was greatly influenced and inspired by the Humanities and Social Sciences — Psychology, Philosophy, Sociology, Logic, History, and Communications. The study of who, what, when, where, why and how people think, has continued to fascinate me. That interest in the human mind led to an ongoing personal-development path, and a strong desire to make a difference in our world, especially for children.

If politics intrigues you, study Political Science to get a better understanding of our political systems and how they work. Hint: When most politicians and political talk show hosts speak, their rhetoric is seldom directed to an audience of higher learning in the subjects of Political Science, Psychology and Logic!

Many entrepreneurs go into business with a strong knowledge of their product or service, but lack a necessary business education to be highly successful. Even self-studying Business Management, Accounting and Bookkeeping, Sales, Advertising and Marketing, Communications, Leadership and Networking can make a significant difference in the success of a small business.

One of the most important subjects to improve every aspect of our lives is communications. To better communicate ideas, understand each other, and get along well with people is valuable in every personal and professional relationship. Yet, such communication skills are seldom taught in grade school. Since few high-school graduates have the skills and confidence to present ideas to an audience, it becomes imperative for each of us to take responsibility for our own self-education and the potential for success in our lives.

Knowledge is Power! The achievement of knowledge is one of the greatest motivators in the world. As we learn, we achieve goals, receive new opportunities, and discover new horizons.

Continued learning improves your life, influences and impacts the lives of those around you. As long as we are learning and growing, our minds are strengthening as well. Old, limiting beliefs about stagnation in old age become irrelevant. We become more effective with the passage of time — new possibilities magically appear. Each new day offers a new page in which to write the story of your life.

Best Wishes for your Continued Learning, Growing, Achievement, Success and Happiness.

Sincerely,

Scott Howard

www.ScottHowardSpeaks.com

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