Scratch in Practice: How Do You Scaffold Peer Learning?

The Scratch Team
May 1 · 3 min read

Scaffolding Collaboration by Providing Roles

On the CSTeachingTips site, Colleen Lewis offers Tips for Pair Programming, describing strategies for managing peer collaboration in classrooms, based on her own research and teaching experience. She suggests ways to structure pair programming so that students learn how to work together and switch roles at specific time intervals. She also suggests the option of “buddy programming”, where students start in pairs but then branch out to work side-by-side on individual projects, exchanging ideas and helping each other as they create.

Scaffolding Collaborative Activities

In a recent research study, Meg Ray, Maya Israel, and two of their colleagues observed how teachers facilitated collaboration in 10 public classrooms, ranging from grades K to 8, all of which included or focused on students with special needs. I found it helpful to see how these researchers categorized the collaboration strategies, describing a continuum from teacher-driven collaboration to student-driven collaboration. I have included a simplified version of their diagram below.

Adapted from Figure 3 by Ray, Israel, Lee, and Do, SIGCSE 2018. To learn more, see their paper.

The Scratch Team Blog

Scratch is a project of the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab.

The Scratch Team

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Scratch is a programming language and the world’s largest online community for kids. It is a project of the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab.

The Scratch Team Blog

Scratch is a project of the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab.