Lights, Camera, Action!

Sean Prashad
Feb 16, 2018 · 4 min read

A new twist on fixing bugs

With our second release around the corner, summer internship interviews happening left and right and not to mention a Capstone project that’s causing a ton of headaches, I’ve been busy to say the least. But I’ve recently turned “busy” into a new kind of busy! Previously, I had taken to blog posts to express, document and portray my OSS work but now, I’m looking to live-stream on YouTube!

YouTube: A new platform

Live-streaming has been something I wanted to try for sometime after being introduced to The Joy of Coding hosted by Mozillian Mike Conley. I wanted to give it a shot as another way of expressing my thoughts and more importantly, practice “speaking out loud” for technical coding interviews (something which I’m not good at under pressure). I think it’s a win-win situation and it’s turned out great so far — see for yourself:

A warm reception on Twitter!

The overall reception as amazing! I received multiple retweets, comments and likes as well as recognition from Kumar McMillan and @diox, both accomplished AMO engineers:

Mathieu enjoyed watching me pick apart the issue!

In addition, I was very happy to see a recent friend, Caitlin Neiman — Community Manager at Mozilla, reach out to say nice work! Caitlin she had vouched for me back in my previous blog post, Revision 0.1: New Projects:

Mozilla swag?! COUNT ME IN!

With such a warm welcome and a deep enjoyment of live-streaming, I think I found how I would like to leave behind my mark on the web! With all that being said, let’s quickly dive into how I was able to setup live-streaming from my Macbook and then into my bugs.

Stream Your Thoughts

Mike had referred me to a program called OBS (Open Broadcaster Software) which was super simply to install: brew cask install obs using Homebrew Cask. Within a few minutes, I had OBS up and running:

Screenception

Instead of writing out an entire guide on how to use OBS, I would love to take this opportunity to reference a great blog post by Drew Tyler! He clearly and concisely outlined the steps needed to setup your own YouTube stream. Feel free to reach out to me on Twitter if you have any further questions!

Action!

With OBS setup, I wanted to break down my thought process for my bug, showing how I was going to tackle things:

Solving Bugs Part 1/4 - github.com/mozilla/addons-server - issue #6899

After exploring what was given to me, I made changes in a variety of source files and ended up with TravisCI breaking. After scratching my head for a bit, I left a comment on my PR asking for feedback to keep me going in the right direction.

With a response from Mathieu in the morning, I set out with some more hints that helped me progress some more:

Solving Bugs Part 2/4 - github.com/mozilla/addons-server - issue #6899
Solving Bugs Part 3/4 - github.com/mozilla/addons-server - issue #6899
Solving Bugs Part 4/4 - github.com/mozilla/addons-server - issue #6899

After waiting on TravisCI to build my latest modifications, I had a beautiful purple “Merged” symbol and another contribution under my belt — woohoo!

Reflection

I really enjoyed live-streaming my work and challenged my fellow peers to do so, but I definitely recognize that not everyone will be comfortable using this method — which is perfectly okay! Overall, I think that having my content on YouTube will expose my work to a larger user base, even if it’s only one speck out of billions of videos. It may also be easier for audiences to consume the audio passively as well as allowing me to link relevant material — like my website :)

A lot of views on my website after my first live-stream!

If you’re interested in following along with my journey, consider subscribing to my YouTube channel to stay up-to-date with what I’m currently doing! I also plan to throw up some videos on how to document OSS contributions on your resume using SharedLatex, prepare for technical and behavioral interviews and a few more topics that will help individuals in the Computer Science field.

Until next time,

Sean

Open Source @ Seneca

The trials, tribulations and triumphs of a Software Development student

Sean Prashad

Written by

Programming, Powerlifting && Pizza

Open Source @ Seneca

The trials, tribulations and triumphs of a Software Development student

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