Flight Review — American Airlines 777–200 New Business Class — ORD to LHR

Ever since American revamped their cabins, I’ve wanted to try this one — their new long haul business class. Let me tell you, I was not disappointed.

Booking

I had to get to Nice, France for my wedding. Since there are no direct flights on AA, or any airline, from Chicago (ORD) I knew I’d have to stop somewhere. London was the easiest solution as it’s a massive destination with solid availability. After setting up an alert on expertflyer.com for availability in business, I sat back and waited. Once the alert came in, I quickly booked. This was before AA devalued their AAdvantage program so business only required 50,000 AAdvantage miles apiece. Now, it’ll cost you 57,500 and fees. I booked for fiancé and myself immediately.

Itinerary –

• ORD to LHR on American Airlines (business)
• LHR to NCE on British Airways (first class)
• 2.5 hour layover in Heathrow

Total Cost — 100,000 miles and about $20.

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american airlines award chart

AA’s post-devaluation business award requirements[/caption]

Admirals Club O’Hare International Terminal 3

As an international business class ticket holder, we were granted access to the admirals club. AA does not allow domestic first class passengers in, which I find ridiculous. Upon arrival, we were each given drink coupons to use at the bar for a premium liquor or beer — a nice touch. Other than that, pretty much everything else, other than snacks, coffee and tea, would cost you — another thing I find ridiculous. This lounge is MASSIVE and is apparently getting bigger with another floor being added soon.

We didn’t have much time so we just had our free drinks, relaxed for a minute, ate some Frontera (which my fiancé went into the terminal to get) and made our way to the gate for boarding.

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admirals club ohare terminal 3

ORD Admirals Club Terminal 3 — Perfect for Plane Watching![/caption]

AA 777–200 Cabin and Seat

American’s new 777’s offer 3 cabins. Business, main cabin extra and main cabin. Their new business cabin configuration is interesting but offers great privacy. There are both forward and backward facing seats in a 1–2–1 configuration (reverse herringbone). All the seats have lie-flat capability and all have access to the aisle.

american airlines 777 business class

The Seat

This may have been…. no scratch that. It was, the most comfortable seat I’ve ever experienced as of recently. The seat offers plenty of room, adjustable angles and privacy perfect for even the longest flights. Unfortunately, American announced in September of 2015 that they’d be suspending the retrofit of their 777 cabins, due to demand issues with their seat manufacturer. This will certainly lead to some confusion and aggravation for those wanting to try this product as its probably going to change once again. I was lucky enough to be able to try this one out and to anyone at AA who reads this — keep or make something identical to this.

Seat Features
• Small Ottoman
• Massive Tray Table
• Outlets
• Small Storage Area
• Touch Screen Entertainment Controls
• Reading Light
• Direct Aisle Access
• Cole Haan Sponsored Amenity Kit
• Mid-flight Gallery Stocked with Snacks & Drinks
• Bose Headsets (passed out by flight attendants)
• Welcome Drink (I always go for the champagne, regardless of the hour)

Conclusion

It sucks American won’t be finishing their 777’s with this product. I enjoyed it thoroughly and left impressed. I’ll even go as far as to say that the seat itself was much more comfortable that BA’s new first class product. That said, I’m confident they’ll come up with something just as good, maybe better. If you don’t want to spend the miles to experience this internationally, it’s available on certain domestic routes (JFK-MIA, JFK-LAX). I have heard this product is a little more cramped on the 787 as the body is a little tighter. A comfortable ride indeed.

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