How to Make Friends in Your 20s and 30s

‘It’s easier to get laid than to make new friends’

Connor Johnston
Oct 27, 2016 · 2 min read

Young people, especially men, have a hard time making friends outside of college. We have been conditioned to meet friends in public school based on arbitrary proximity.

Mike Cernovich discusses how to fill this gap in his YouTube video, “How to Make Friends in Your 20s and 30s.”

Are you doing the things that you want to do socially? Or are you watching TV? Playing video games? Simulating connection on social media?

A part that especially resonated with me was his plea for young men to get out to meetups and deal with the anxiety that entails. He says:

I tell people to go to meetups — and a lot of guys are like, “Well, I was nervous going in.”
“You gotta fuckin’ show up, man. You gotta show up. You gotta feel anxious. You gotta swim in deeper waters. If you don’t swim in deeper waters you won’t learn how to swim.

My life has been changed for the better in an infinitely positive way since I joined a local Freedomain Radio meetup group. Yes — there was a ton of anxiety in meeting new people this way.

But it is better to be anxious and alive than dead and bored.

Click the play button below, find out how to break the cycle of isolation, how to be vulnerable and valuable in a friendship, and learn the art and principle of reciprocity.

Self-Knowledge Daily

“Rational thoughts for self-connected people.” We write about the small, sometimes almost imperceptible steps we take when we commit to knowing ourselves. Progress comes over time — through a consistent commitment to principles of philosophy and self-growth.

Thanks to Cheryl L. Hulseapple.

Connor Johnston

Written by

Western civilization, personal development for young men, empathy for children, philosophy for all.

Self-Knowledge Daily

“Rational thoughts for self-connected people.” We write about the small, sometimes almost imperceptible steps we take when we commit to knowing ourselves. Progress comes over time — through a consistent commitment to principles of philosophy and self-growth.