The Indescribable Complexity of Being

A close friend recently filmed a Facebook Live video on the characteristics of GenXers, those of us born between 1965 and 1979. As I watched her describe some of the key characteristics of my generation, I nodded along — yes I was a latch-key child, yes very independent, yes indeed expressing an entrepreneurial spirit.

Consider for a moment how my being born into a specific generation then intersects with my gender, a time when girls were receiving messages of empowerment from their mothers who had been actively engaged in the women’s rights movement.

Now layer on my Myers Briggs type — INFJ, considered to be one of the rarest types. Read any meme or ‘12 characteristics of the INFJ personality' and it’s like I wrote it myself.

I’m an artist and a teacher, from a family of artists and teachers. I’ve always had a strong connection to animals and the natural world. I grew up in Oregon, but lived in several different regions of the U.S. which provided me with a cross-sectional perspective on American culture. I’ve been a world traveler, yet there are still so many places I want to visit. Including a trip to outer space, which is the mac daddy of my bucket list. Can you just imagine the humbling experience of looking out over our entire world at once?

Four years ago, I discovered I am a highly sensitive person — a deep thinker, intuitive and very heart connected. I also identify as an empath, capable of experiencing others’ emotions like they are my own. Sometimes this feels like a gift, other times it’s a real challenge to know where I end and someone else begins.

And then there’s my lifelong propensity to be a spiritual seeker, studying numerous religious and spiritual traditions. Sifting through the layers to connect the common threads in mankind’s search for deeper meaning.

This indescribable complexity of being — it’s a shared human condition. Call it the reason that we each seem to be compelled at some point to dive deep into the key question:

Who am I?

Layers upon layers upon layers of everything that makes up our identities plus that extra something special, our unique Divine spark that surpasses definition.

What if we’re supposed to be asking slightly different questions?

Like, who am I becoming? Or, what new level of consciousness am I rising up to? What path is emerging for me? Do I trust my inner knowing to courageously step forward?

What if we never, ever really know exactly who we are? What if in every moment we are simply making micro-shifts into a slightly higher awareness and maturity?

Hmm, identity as a constantly moving target, very interesting…

One of my favorite quotes from Mahatma Gandhi: ‘Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony.’

So what does it look like to move ourselves into alignment?

First, it requires attentive self-observation. Notice I didn’t say self-criticism, which is an entirely different thing altogether. A self-observant person celebrates their strengths, is aware of the things they are working to improve and understands we all have blind spots — that place where we don’t even know what we don’t even know.

Second, when we observe an incongruence in our behavior or our words or our beliefs, we become curious. What am I supposed to be learning right at this moment? What patterns and synchronicities are lining up? Where might I be in resistance to what wants to happen?

Finally, we tap into our deep, inner intuitive knowing as a guidepost for moving forward. We learn to trust what we ‘know’ in our heart, what is clearly in the highest good for all involved. What brings the greatest opportunity for choice and growth and freedom. Honoring each of us where we are right now.

So, how are you showing up?

Are your thoughts, actions, words and beliefs in alignment?

What’s possible as you step into your future self?


Is it time to come into alignment in your life? I invite you to explore whether my Life Shift one-to-one coaching program might be the right fit. Learn more and apply…

To your highest good,

Bevin