Sorry Scrum, the Game Might Be Over for You!

The market is shifting in a new direction, can Scrum still find its space?

David Pereira
Serious Scrum
Published in
8 min readMar 16, 2021

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A chess table with all pieces down besides a pawn
Photo by Randy Fath on Unsplash

It’s impossible to ignore how well known Scrum is. For years, Scrum was the first choice among Agile frameworks for most companies worldwide; only a few would challenge it. But recently, something changed, organizations are losing trust in Scrum. After failing to get meaningful results, many places are replacing Scrum with SAFe, Kanban, or other frameworks.

Beyond unsatisfied organizations, experienced professionals are reluctant to work with Scrum. Many people even feel embarrassed to be called as a Product Owner or a Scrum Master. The market is shifting in a new direction, will there still be space for Scrum?

Companies want to be Agile, but they struggle to renounce the old command and control style.

Let me elaborate on why I believe the game might be over for Scrum.

Notice: The content of this article is based on my experience and observations over the last ten years. That’s why I invite you to share your perspective as well.

Scrum Is Not a Process!

Software Development is still something new; the first piece of software appeared only in 1948. I guess Tom Kilburn couldn’t imagine how fast the world would advance with software development.

Computer scientist Tom Kilburn is responsible for writing the world’s very first piece of software, which was run at 11 a.m. on June 21, 1948, at the University of Manchester in England.

Micah Yost, A Brief History of Software Development

Until the new millennial, companies lacked techniques to match customers’ expectations. Most companies focused on improving the processes around software development. Despite all efforts implementing heavy processes like Rational Unified Process, the quality was still questionable and customers unhappy. Building useless software frustrated many people; a revolution was needed.

Although Agile frameworks like Scrum and eXtreme Programming already existed, it was in 2001 when the Agile Manifesto came into place that…

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David Pereira
Serious Scrum

I don't write on Medium anymore. Find my content at Untrapping Product Teams https://dpereira.substack.com/