Researchers Asked Commuters to Talk to Strangers. It Didn’t Go Well.

And it explains why singlehood is on the rise.

Carlyn Beccia
Sexography

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Researchers Asked Commuters to Talk to Strangers. It Didn’t Go Well.
The Red Queen’s Race by John Tenniel, 1871 | Public Domain

I hear a lot of complaints from single people. But one of the most common complaints is that they have nowhere to meet people other than dating apps. My response to this seemingly insurmountable hurdle always shuts them up.

When was the last time you talked to a stranger?

And then their faces turn as white as their glowing phone screens. Talk to strangers? Shudders. Only creeps talk to strangers. Today, flirting is texting a gross innuendo or a naked picture of your junk. Thanks, dating apps.

People used to fall in love the way Hemingway went bankrupt — gradually, then suddenly. Now, we move twice as fast and never seem to go anywhere.

“It takes all the running you can do to keep in the same place,” advised the Red Queen to Alice. Technology has kept us running in place. We might have more connections than our parents, but we do not have deeper ones.

Case in point. A survey asked people if they had more than ten close friends. In 1990, 33% of respondents reported having at least ten close friends. Now, that number has dropped to 13%.

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Carlyn Beccia
Sexography

Author & illustrator. My latest books — 10 AT 10, MONSTROUS: THE LORE, GORE, & SCIENCE, and THEY LOST THEIR HEADS. Contact: CarlynBeccia.com