Fall 2017: Week 10

by ann

It’s hard to believe that just 10 weeks ago students were meeting for the first time. The creativity, openness, and communal spirit of the fall 2017 group truly made it a special class. In their final week at SFPC, students met for a final crit with Morehshin, a pep talk and artist life workshop with Taeyoon, and a big, hug-filled family lunch with the SFPC teachers, TA, and staff.

Day 1: Recoded sketches

On day 1, anumber of students came in to school to work on Recoded sketches in preparation for a corporate event that Wednesday. For the event, students were turning animations and illustrations from Zipeng Zhu into fun and interactive recoded pieces.

Students work on their sketches

Day 2: Final Crit with Morehshin

On day 2, students met for a final crit with Morehshin. Morehshin started the class by asking each student to describe themselves professionally in three words, e.g. artist, writer, and programmer. Though labels can be limiting, they can also be an opportunity to define or redefine yourself and your practice. Morehshin encouraged the class to be bold and take the label you want rather than waiting for someone else to define one for you.

The class then stopped by each artwork from the final showcase and spent around 10 minutes discussing the strengths of the piece and where to take it in the future.

Day 3: Artist Life Workshop with Taeyoon

On day 3, students met with Taeyoon at Data & Society, where Taeyoon is currently a fellow, for an artist life workshop.

First, Taeyoon introduced the concepts of a project description, an artist statement, and a project proposal.

Taeyoon shares a sample project proposal

A project description is a recounting of how a project looks, sounds, feels, and smells. It also covers the production process and materials, and the message of the piece.

An artist statement is a high level overview of an artist’s intention, interests, and inspiration.

Finally, a project proposal is a detailed overview of a yet-to-be-realized project for use with grant and residency applications. It includes a project description as well as a budget and schedule.

Afterwords, students spent time writing project descriptions for their showcase pieces, and also draft artist statements. They then shared their statements with the group.

Students work on their artist statements

Though it can be daunting to write and speak about your own work, it’s a key aspect of connecting with others through art. It is also an essential tool for reflecting on and growing within your own practice.

Art writing may serve different purposes. In all cases, writing has become an integral part of art practice especially since Conceptual Art. Writing helps bridge the gap between: Making (private practice) — Experience (limited engagement) — Documentation (post production, archive).
— Taeyoon Choi

Day 4: Deinstall

On day 4 students deinstalled and packed up. Projectors were taken down from the ceiling, shelves demounted from walls, and odds and ends cleared out from closets and storage rooms.

One project, Colin’s true mirror, found a permanent home in SFPC’s entry hallway.

Colin deinstalling then reinstalling his mirror
Taking a break from deinstalling

Day 5: Goodbye lunch

On the final day of SFPC, students met with teachers and TAs for a final family lunch. Taeyoon, Zach, and Morehshin each gave a short goodbye pep talk and students shared plans for the future.

But it was only a temporary goodbye. Since the fall 2017 class ended, students have continued meeting, sketching, and sharing over slack and in person.

SFPC is not just a venue for learning and making, it’s also an artistic community and a chance to meet lifelong friends.

Thank you all and see you soon!

Goodbye speeches from Taeyoon, Morehshin, and Zach

And more pictures and a video from Yumi!

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