Murals of Phoenix

Colors swirl throughout the valley and down the streets of downtown Phoenix. The winds carry colors that splatter the walls of individual buildings throughout the city. Beautiful murals stretch, stand, and sprawl around corners of coffee shops, yoga studios, and apartment complexes. Local and traveling artists have taken advantage of the huge canvases to give the city the gift of blooming color. Different masterpieces depict the human form, vast landscapes, wildlife, and more. They can cover entire buildings or small patches of concrete. The colors range from stiff black and whites to vibrant pools of color and everywhere in between.

One mural sits in the center of Phoenix on the ASU Downtown campus. It stands as a box on the corner of First Street and Fillmore. The paints contrast the dry desert backdrop and allow a pop of color on a gloomy day. However, once the sunsets in the valley the box blends into the same color sky. This allows the box to create a reflecting illusion as the colors blend together as both mural and reality. The box was created by Jesse Perry in 2015. He has named it Color Burst Sunset and it was one of 14 murals he completed in 2015. The 31-year-old artist paints all over the valley. He has worked for associations such as the Scottsdale Public Art Program, Collections Assistant and the Downtown Phoenix Journal.

Since the early 2010’s Phoenix’s art district has trickled down the streets and through the veins of the city. Now Roosevelt Row dubs itself an artist’s row to create and be free for self-expression. They consider the murals as more as masterpieces than graffiti. No two murals are alike and artists continue to create. There are now at least over 40 murals scattered over the valley and more artists are looking to put their name on the map. Every first Friday of the month is dedicated to artist’s works and the murals great the back drop for these gatherings that bring hundreds of people to the city each month. Perry’s box sits only a few blocks south of Roosevelt Row watching the sunset.

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