Singer From Music Band ABBA Was Born in the Horrific Nazi Project

Anni-Frid Lyngstad was born because of the notorious Lebensborn program

Peter Preskar
Apr 30 · 3 min read
Member of ABBA band. Anni-Frid Lyngstad is the first from the right (Image:abbaannualviggso.blogspot.com/)

BBA was one of the most popular music groups in history. You have probably heard at least one of their hits. For example Waterloo, SOS, or Mamma Mia. At the height of their popularity, ABBA earned more money than another Swedish trademark — automobile company Volvo.

Lebensborn means Spring of life in German. However, this word received a much more malevolent meaning in the time of Nazi Germany. The Lebensborn program was a notorious Nazi project, which tried to increase the Aryan population. They used various inhumane methods, including state-sponsored breeding and abducting of children from Nazi-occupied countries such as Poland, Russia, and Yugoslavia.

The ideal Aryan had blue eyes and blonde hair. The Scandinavians perfectly fit into this requirement. The Lebensborn program encouraged German soldiers to have relationships with Danish and Norwegian women. In Norway only, over 12,000 children were born from such relationships.

However, after Nazi Germany lost World War II, these children and women were ostracized. The women were called the “German whores.” The children received derogatory nicknames such as “SS bastard”, “rat,” or “Nazi child.” They were abused, imprisoned in mental institutions, and the Norwegian government even tried to deport them to Australia!

At a certain point in time, the Norwegian military partnered with the CIA and used the Lebensborn children for experiments with LSD, mescaline, and other drugs.

Anni-Frid Lyngstad was born to Norwegian mother Synni Lyngstad and a German sergeant Alfred Haase on 15 November 1945, few months after Germany had lost the war and her father had departed back home. Afraid to face humiliation by fellow Norwegians, Synni Lyngstad took her baby Anni-Frid and together with her mother Anni left Norway. They immigrated to Sweden, which tolerated the Lebensborn children.

In 1947, Anni-Frid’s mother died because of kidney failure. Only two years old Anni-Frid was raised by her grandmother Anni.

Anni-Frid believed that her biological father Alfred Haase had died on his way back to Germany since his ship had been reported as sunk.

A newspaper article with a photo of Anni-Frid Lyngstad and her father Alfred Haase (Image: abbaarticles.blogspot.com)

In 1977, a German magazine published a story of Anni-Frid Lyngstad as the Lebensborn child. Her half-brother Peter Haase read the story and asked his father about his whereabouts during World War II.

A few months later, Anni-Frid Lyngstad finally met her father Alfred for the first time.

“It’s difficult… it would have been different if I’d been a teenager or a child. I can’t really connect to him and love him the way I would have if he’d been around when I grew up.”

— Anni-Frid Lyngstad after meeting her father

Anni-Frid was one of the luckiest Lebensborn children since she had escaped to relatively tolerant Sweden. She also found out her true identity and met her biological father.

Over eighty-five percent of the Lebensborn children never found out who their actual parents were.

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