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Here are a few recent articles which you might have missed. Follow the blog on Twitter to stay updated.

Tesco Clubcard duo move into theatre marketing,

Clive Humby and Edwina Dunn, founders of Dunhumby — the data analytics company behind Clubcard — are making a ‘seven-figure’ investment in theatre analytics company Purple Seven in a bid to improve the way theatres market to their audiences. As well as investing cash, the pair say they will be using their previous experience to develop new techniques for looking at audience data, which they claim could unlock £250 million of commercial opportunities for the theatre industry.

Trevor O’Donnell suggests we treat corporate customers like donors,

I have a lawyer friend who works in a big L.A. firm that gets tickets to everything…GREAT tickets — really good seats. If there’s prestige attached to having the seats or if there’s an opportunity to make a client happy with premium access to a game, concert or cultural event, no problem, done deal, you’ll have them this afternoon.

Seth Godin provides lessons for theatre signage,

If you’ve arranged the flights on the monitor in order of flight time, not destination, requiring me to stop and take out my ticket, you have failed.
If you’ve hidden the room numbers (or given them fancy names) so that only an employee can find the right spot, you’ve failed as well.

Gordon Cox at Variety provides a stateside view of ATG’s acquisition of Foxwoods Theater,

The acquisition nonetheless makes for a notable shift in that the Foxwoods, one of the few theaters not owned by Gotham’s dominant triumvirate of Broadway landlords or by a nonprofit, is now owned for the first time in years by a company whose core business is theater…Given a Foxwoods pricetag of more than $60 million, a lot of New York industry types believe ATG overpaid for a difficult-to-book venue with a spotty track record (although on the other hand, the valuation of every other theater on the Rialto just shot up).

Broadway attendances are down 6%,

Attendance for shows on the Great White Way dropped 6% over the last season, marking the second straight year ticket sales have fallen. Theater mavens blame critical flops in the fall half of the May-to-May season — along with Hurricane Sandy — for keeping patrons from buying tickets that jumped 9% in price to an average $101 apiece.

Originally published on June 7, 2013.