Recipe

Honey Oatmeal Bread Made with Love

My grandma’s oatmeal bread recipe is a family favorite.

Patricia Davis
Dec 20, 2020 · 8 min read
Image for post
Image for post
I made this loaf using wild yeast levain (aka sourdough starter) instead of store bought yeast. Photo by Patricia Davis — Author.

Honey Oatmeal Bread Recipe

Print this recipe — it includes the original recipe using store-bought yeast.

Start with a poolish mix — Mixture 1

A poolish mix is used to give your wild yeast stamina and strength. This is the equivalent to dissolving your store-bought yeast in warm water and adding a bit of sugar to make it start rising. While store bought yeast does this within minutes, it takes several hours for the poolish mix to develop.

Poolish Ingredients

⅓ cup (75 grams) water
½ cup (75 grams) flour
⅔ cup (150 grams) wild yeast starter, fed within the last 8 hours

Create your oat base — Mixture 2

As this is oatmeal bread, this part of the recipe is the star. You want to use rolled oats, not instant, as they hold up better, absorb less water, and give the bread a better texture. I use Quaker Old Fashioned rolled oats, but you can use whatever brand you prefer.

Oatmeal base ingredients

1 ¾ cups (413 grams) boiling water
1 cup (80 grams) rolled oats
2 tablespoons (28 grams) unsalted butter

Mix it all together

Stir the poolish mix (mixture 1) into the oat mix (mixture 2.) Continue to stir until thoroughly mixed together before beginning to add the flour.

Remaining ingredient

5 ¼ cups (746 grams) flour

Knead the dough — this is not scary, I promise!

Scrape the dough from your bowl onto the floured surface. Fold the dough toward you and press down firmly with the ball of your hand, pushing away from you. The dough will feel somewhat resistant to being pushed. Lift the dough and rotate ¼ turn, then repeat the fold and push technique.

Let it rise

Image for post
Image for post
Image for post
Image for post
On the left, you can see how my unrisen dough holds its shape in a boulle. On the right, you can see that it has doubled in size. Photos by Patricia Davis — Author.

Form and proof the loaves

Once the dough has doubled in size, it is time to form the loaves. I found that it is best to treat the dough gently from this point forward. Do not punch down the dough or press all the air out of it. Because wild yeast is delicate, you will want to keep as much of the rise in the dough as you can.

Image for post
Image for post
Image for post
Image for post
Image for post
Image for post
Begin rolling away from you, with the 9" side facing you. Photos by Patricia Davis — Author.
Image for post
Image for post
Image for post
Image for post
The loaves on the left are ready to proof and the loaves on the right have proofed for 4 hours in my oven. Photos by Patricia Davis — Author.

Bake the bread

Preheat your oven to 325°F. Be sure to remove the plastic wrap from your loaf pans before baking the bread. Before you bake your bread, you will want to split the top using a sharp knife or a bread lame and brush it with a tablespoon of melted butter to help it brown.

Image for post
Image for post
Split the top of the loaf using a sharp knife or lame. Angle the knife/lame at a 45° angle and score it quickly. Photo by Patricia Davis — Author.

Don’t be afraid of making bread at home

I know that many people are intimidated by making bread at home. I promise, with a little practice, you will find success. Using the wild yeast is a little bit more advanced than using store-bought yeast, so try my original recipe while you learn. Then, once you are more confident, give the converted recipe a try.

Simply Living and Living Simply

Get in touch with what matters to you: Gardening, Food, Crafting, Sewing, Teaching, Books and more.

Sign up for Living Life Your Way

By Simply Living and Living Simply

Get inspired to build a simpler, more productive life. Live a life you love. Take a look.

By signing up, you will create a Medium account if you don’t already have one. Review our Privacy Policy for more information about our privacy practices.

Check your inbox
Medium sent you an email at to complete your subscription.

Patricia Davis

Written by

Pat is a certified ELA, speech, and drama teacher. She enjoys writing, reading, baking, gardening, and crafting. Top writer in Food and Cooking.

Simply Living and Living Simply

Lifestyle, Living, Gardening, Food, Crafts, Sewing, Teaching, Books

Patricia Davis

Written by

Pat is a certified ELA, speech, and drama teacher. She enjoys writing, reading, baking, gardening, and crafting. Top writer in Food and Cooking.

Simply Living and Living Simply

Lifestyle, Living, Gardening, Food, Crafts, Sewing, Teaching, Books

Medium is an open platform where 170 million readers come to find insightful and dynamic thinking. Here, expert and undiscovered voices alike dive into the heart of any topic and bring new ideas to the surface. Learn more

Follow the writers, publications, and topics that matter to you, and you’ll see them on your homepage and in your inbox. Explore

If you have a story to tell, knowledge to share, or a perspective to offer — welcome home. It’s easy and free to post your thinking on any topic. Write on Medium

Get the Medium app