This is a piece of legislation that meets the demands of the moment.

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Joe Biden. Alex Wong/Getty Images

Joe Biden does indeed want to go big. The president-elect is presenting a propose a new, $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package on Thursday night as the first item on his to-do list in office, a plan aimed at speeding up the vaccination rollout while providing vast amounts of financial support to households as well as state and local governments.

Of course, the proposal includes checks. Biden would top off the last round of cash payments Congress approved in December with an extra $1,400, bringing the total to $2,000 per individual (the payments still phase down and eventually disappear for higher earners). He would also bump the federal unemployment insurance supplement from $300 to $400 per week, and extend it all the way to September, instead of allowing it to expire in March. There’s an additional $130 billion for schools, and $350 billion in emergency funding for state and local governments, with more for transit systems. There is additional money for small businesses, child care, emergency paid leave, rent relief, and utility bill relief. …


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Jared and Ivanka with their proprietary toilets. Photo illustration by Slate. Photos by Alex Wong/Getty Images and Stockbyte via Getty Images Plus.

The Washington Post has Thursday’s biggest toilet news. It concerns the house that Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump have been renting in the District of Columbia:


Even after almost dying, they are screaming about their right to blather while in the act of blathering.

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Rep. Marjorie Taylor Green (R-GA) wears a protective mask reading “CENSORED” at the U.S. Capitol on January 13, 2021. Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

One of the persistent mysteries of the past week is what leads Republican House members — some of whom had to crouch on the floor of the chamber while the Capitol was under attack while others were whisked into unidentified locations for their own safety — to refuse to accept who was to blame for the insurrection. With the exception of the 10 Republican House members who voted alongside the Democrats to impeach the president, and a smattering of Republicans who acknowledged that the events of last week could easily have ended their lives but wanted to to investigate matters, a non-trivial number of Republicans took to the floor on Wednesday to insist that the injury of January 6, 2021 was to their own free speech rights. This was perhaps best embodied in the galactically stupid visual of Rep. …


If McConnell ends up doing the right thing, let’s not confuse it with valor.

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Mitch McConnell in a joint session of Congress on Jan. 6, after the Capitol riot. Saul Loeb/Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is reported to be “furious” and “done” with President Donald Trump. McConnell, the emerging thinking goes, is an institutionalist, and seeing the institution he presides over literally come under attack at the direction of his political ally, he’s at long last had enough. “If you’re McConnell, you want to be remembered for defending the Senate and the institution,” a Republican in McConnell’s circle told Axios. Being for defending the Senate, of course, isn’t quite the same as actually defending the Senate. As we’ve seen over the last weeks (and years), collective American understanding and memory of an event doesn’t always reflect what actually took place. …


Wednesday’s siege further entrenched the Republican Party as the party of male entitlement.

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Donald Trump supporters storm the building on January 6. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Among the insurrectionist mob that attempted an overthrow of the U.S. government on Wednesday was Richard “Bigo” Barnett, a 60-year-old Donald Trump supporter who’d traveled to D.C. from Arkansas for the rally-turned-riot. He soon became one of the attack’s most recognizable faces: After the rioters broke windows, beat down doors, and assaulted law enforcement officers to get into the Capitol building, Barnett installed himself behind a desk in the office of Speaker Nancy Pelosi. There, he rested his foot on the desk and gleefully posed for photos.

What else did Barnett do during the Capitol siege? “I wrote [Pelosi] a nasty note” — “Nancy, Bigo was here you bitch,” the note said — “and scratched my balls,” he told a New York Times reporter. …


Any attempt to bring the Joker to justice is likely to fail, or backfire.

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“Curses! The consequences of our own actions!” 20th Century Fox

It’s been a traumatizing couple of weeks in Gotham City, full of unthinkable violence and chaos. We’ve all seen the appalling footage: the exploding shark, the pier bombing, and the United World Organization building — until last week, a powerful symbol of the democratic hopes of the entire world — being invaded, vandalized, and defiled by the “United Underworld,” an alliance between the city’s most dastardly criminals: Catwoman, the Penguin, the Riddler, and even the Joker, the coolest supervillain of them all (although his role in the plot was very minor or maybe even nonexistent, from what I’m hearing). …


They made off with laptops and even accessed Nancy Pelosi’s computer. Here’s how worried legislators should be.

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Rioters had access to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s computer. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

President Donald Trump’s speech on Wednesday inciting the mob that attacked Congress resulted in five deaths and a number of hospitalizations, the pillaging of the Capitol, and a major embarrassment for American democracy at home and abroad. After investigators survey the damage, we may discover that it also led to a cybersecurity breach.

On Thursday, acting U.S. Attorney for D.C. Michael Sherwin announced, “Electronic items were stolen from senators’ offices. Documents, materials were stolen, and we have to identify what was done, mitigate that, and it could have potential national security equities.” CBS reported that one of those electronics was a laptop that may have held sensitive national security information. Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley said that rioters stole a laptop from his office, though it’s unclear whether it was the same one CBS was referring to. Reuters reported on Thursday that, according to a congressional aide, a laptop was also taken from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office. Congressional laptops contain information that could help intruders gain access to federal networks. Even if the thieves didn’t have the time or know-how to access the laptops during the riot, they could later take those devices to an experienced hacker. Devices in Congress are not required to have two-factor authentication, as is the case for the executive branch of the federal government. …


In 13 pictures and videos.

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All photos by Aymann Ismail

I was among Trump supporters at the Ellipse, the park where Trump’s Save America March rally was underway, when the president told his supporters to head to the Capitol. They didn’t wait. Around 1:30 p.m., before he finished his speech, much of his rally peeled away and began its march to where Congress was already in session to certify the Electoral College vote. I went too and followed the crowd into the Capitol.

You can read my account of what happened here, but below, here is the story in photos and videos I took, from the speech to inside the Capitol to back outside, where rioters were stunned when the police actually started to shut them down. …


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Trump supporters protest outside the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Alex Edelman/Getty Images

Many Americans watching in horror Wednesday as pro-Trump rioters stormed the Capitol noticed that in all the footage of clashes and violence in Washington, there were very few arrests. The U.S. Capitol police, somehow unprepared to handle the mass of protesters, focused on managing the crowds and pushing rioters from the building. As of Wednesday night, reports indicated that D.C. police had arrested 13 people, and the Capitol police had not said if it made any additional arrests.

But a wave of arrests will likely follow. There are hours of footage and countless dramatic photos revealing the faces of the often mask-less rioters breaching the Capitol, seizing property, lounging in legislators’ offices, and parading through the halls. There’s likely also security and body camera footage. …


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A supporter of President Donald Trump carries a Confederate battle flag on the second floor of the U.S. Capitol near the entrance to the Senate after breaching security defenses. Reuters/Mike Theiler

On Wednesday, supporters of Donald Trump, goaded on by the president, stormed the U.S. Capitol. Here’s a selection of the most striking and horrifying photographs taken inside and outside the building.

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