Why Coworking is Smart

Imagine going to work at a place that inspires you. A place that doesn’t just provide you with a desk and computer, but with an environment that lights you up from the inside out. A place you want to go, something that feels as new and fresh as the ideas in your head.

SmartWork Monnaie

Sound great?

If your head is nodding, it turns out that you are not alone.

A large population of entrepreneurs and imaginative CEOs are trading in traditional work places and discovering alternative solutions. And while working from home might seem like an easy solution, it turns out that a home office isn’t as dreamy as it sounds.

Many entrepreneurs, freelancers and start-ups have tested the “work from home” model, only to discover that it is isolating, distracting, and draining. It’s difficult to switch from “home” brain to “work” brain or, in other words, it’s hard to know when to start working and when to stop.

So what are smart business-minded individuals doing instead?

A new model is sweeping the globe and it is revolutionizing the way individuals work. Coworking is an opportunity for people to enjoy the energy that comes from working in a group environment without compromising on location or amenities.

Instead of being wholly responsible for the cost of renting a prime office space, coworking allows workers to split the cost, making the best places in the city affordably within reach. Other benefits of coworking include getting out of the home (i.e. clear lines drawn between personal life and business life) and being a part of a bustling, dynamic workspace.

Several companies around the world are offering these coworking solutions, making it as simple as just paying a small membership fee monthly or quarterly. That means that all you have to do is show up.

Why People Thrive in Coworking Spaces?

Coworking is smart for many reasons. Harvard Business Review published research studying why people thrive in coworking spaces. Here is an overview of key benefits that were identified:

“Unlike a traditional office, coworking spaces consist of members who work for a range of different companies, ventures, and projects. Because there is little direct competition or internal politics, they don’t feel they have to put on a work persona to fit in. Working amidst people doing different kinds of work can also make one’s own work identity stronger”
Coworkers share “a culture where it is the norm to help each other out, and there are many opportunities to do so; the variety of workers in the space means that coworkers have unique skill sets that they can provide to other community members”

People who use coworking spaces have more job control

“Coworking spaces are normally accessible 24/7. People can decide whether to put in a long day when they have a deadline or want to show progress, or can decide to take a long break in the middle of the day to go to the gym. They can choose whether they want to work in a quiet space so they can focus, or in a more collaborative space with shared tables where interaction is encouraged. They can even decide to work from home, without repercussion, if they need to meet a repairperson or deal with a family member need”.

The risk to trying coworking is minimal to none. Most coworking places allow you to work in their spaces on a month-to-month basis, which means that there is no time like the present to get out of your comfort zone and try something new.

The biggest risk, it seems, is ignoring the opportunity and failing on your own.

Success is right around the corner. If “around the corner” is in Brussels (Belgium), you may want to check out one of the two new coworking spaces of SmartWork.