Chronic Misconceptions

On a good day, I usually use marijuana about 4–5 times a day; before bed, before working out, before going into the mall, as long as I am not driving, I will smoke. Not a big deal right? Because I am sure almost everyone knows at least one person who uses marijuana, one way or another. Being that marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the United States, regardless of its legal status. But who did you just imagine? What person just formed in your mind, after reading about my habits? A hippie? Someone disengaged from reality? Someone lazy? How about someone with no direction? Someone stupid? Or someone irresponsible?

If you imagined any of these,do not fret, you are not the only one. Despite being actively aware of these stereotypes and how untrue they can be, I still resort to them when someone admits they are a cannabis user. As a user myself, I would have thought that these impressions would have been altered positively, but unfortunately that was and is not the case.

http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/stoner-sloth-antimarijuana-campaign-from-nsw-government-relentlessly-ridiculed-20151219-glrjzh.html

I made the conscious decision to begin smoking weed at the ripe age of 24. Making me a full blown adult with the mental and emotional capacity to make it. The decision was given much consideration and was not made lightly. Yet, despite the amount of maturity that goes into this daily decision, I am still regarded as irresponsible.

Despite the inaccuracy of these labels, they continue to follow me through my day to day life. Still, I refuse to regard my decision, then and now, as a weakness. Which is why I not only continue to use it, but to advocate for it as well. I educate myself so that I know and I can share that information. I was asked to write about something I am interested in and I chose marijuana. Not because I want to smoke it everyday of my life to escape reality, but because I believe in what it can provide. I do not look at it as a answer to any problem, but I do look at it as a way to cope.

I asked you about the image that popped into your mind when I opened up about my habits, and the stereotypes that follow. So, now, what do you see? If I have changed or blurred that image whatsoever, then I did what I intended to do.