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Sick, but not sick enough: Exploring Experiences of Individuals with Rare Neurodiverse Conditions

On 1st December 2020, Tallulah Clark gave a presentation on her third year undergraduate dissertation at the University of Sheffield.

The session was attended by over 20 people.

This dissertation explores and details the experiences of individuals with neurological differences within the education system, portraying the thoughts and feelings shared by those who have found their learning experiences more challenging than the neurotypical majority. The study arose from the authors own personal history and experiences as a neurodiverse student, compelling her to conduct research into the experiences of others who are and have been in a similar position to her. The purpose of this dissertation is to highlight the challenges and barriers faced by neurodiverse individuals, as well as to uncover some of the ‘invisible’ symptoms and how these affect experiences within the education system. The concept of an ‘invisible illness’ is also discussed, something which both participants and author deem highly significant in shaping their academic and social experiences. The implications of the study suggest that the education system must do more to encourage students who are eligible to take their place in higher education by supporting their application and continuing to provide necessary guidance throughout their studies. Equally, the findings suggest the need to better equip staff with specific training about neurological differences, ‘invisible’ symptoms and their implications.

Read the dissertation

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Education Matters

Education Matters

Research at the School of Education, University of Sheffield. For more information about us, visit www.sheffield.ac.uk/education.