7 Plants Known For Their Healing Properties That Come With A Dark Side

Ever wondered what Azaleas, Açaí berries, Cinnamon, Star Anise, St. John’s Wort, Caster beans, and Lychee fruit all have in common?

Photo by Jamie Trinh on Unsplash

Here Are 7 Plants Known For Their Healing Properties That Come With A Dark Side:

Azalea

Due to the extensive phytochemical profile of this plant, Azaleas are sometimes utilized as a healing remedy for a variety of different ailments and diseases. Traditionally speaking, the flowers of this plant can be used to treat digestive issues, headache, inflammation, as well as bacterial and fungal infections.

Açaí Pulp

Berries will forever be one of the healthiest, most healing plants you can consume on a regular basis — and that’s largely due to something referred to as their Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity Index (ORAC) (3).

Cinnamon

Did you know that adding a single teaspoon of cinnamon to your meals has the ability to raise antioxidant content, significantly boost the immune system, and reduce widespread inflammation within the entire body (6)?

Star Anise

Used predominantly as a highly regarded spice with powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory characteristics, Chinese star anise is linked to nothing but delicious Masala spice blends and tasty chai lattes.

St. John’s Wort

Not only does evidence suggest St. John’s Wort as being an effective herbal remedy for inducing and promoting sleep, but preliminary research has identified its ability to reduce some of the harmful effects associated with sleep deprivation, too (10).

Castor beans

Caster beans (and their derivative, caster oil) have a number of uses in both alternative medicine practices and the pharmaceutical industry.

Lychee fruit

Lychee — also spelled litchi or lichi — is a sweet and popular fruit often touted for its medicinal uses in traditional cultures throughout China, India, Vietnam, Indonesia, and the Philippines.

Futher Reading

For more information on plants that harm (and heal), I strongly suggest picking up your own copy of Plants, People, and Culture by acclaimed Ethnobotanists, Dr. Michael J. Balik, and Dr. Paul Alan Cox.

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  2. The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 (GBD 2010)
  3. Nóbrega AA, Garcia MH, Tatto E, Obara MT, Costa E, Sobel J, Araujo WN. Oral transmission of Chagas disease by consumption of açaí palm fruit, Brazil. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009 Apr;15(4):653–5.
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  5. Kawatra, P., & Rajagopalan, R. (2015). Cinnamon: Mystic powers of a minute ingredient. Pharmacognosy research, 7(Suppl 1), S1–S6.
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  8. Balick, M.J., & Cox, P.A. (2020). Plants, People, and Culture: The Science of Ethnobotany (2nd ed.). Garland Science.
  9. Kumar A, Singh A. Protective effect of St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) extract on 72-hour sleep deprivation-induced anxiety-like behavior and oxidative damage in mice. Planta Med. 2007 Oct;73(13):1358–64.
  10. Balick, M.J., & Cox, P.A. (2020). Plants, People, and Culture: The Science of Ethnobotany (2nd ed.). Garland Science.
  11. Saraf, S., Sahu, S., Kaur, C. D., & Saraf, S. (2010). Comparative measurement of hydration effects of herbal moisturizers. Pharmacognosy research, 2(3), 146–151.
  12. Balick, M.J., & Cox, P.A. (2020). Plants, People, and Culture: The Science of Ethnobotany (2nd ed.). Garland Science.
  13. Ibrahim SR, Mohamed GA. Litchi chinensis: medicinal uses, phytochemistry, and pharmacology. J Ethnopharmacol. 2015 Nov 4;174:492–513.
  14. Balick, M.J., & Cox, P.A. (2020). Plants, People, and Culture: The Science of Ethnobotany (2nd ed.). Garland Science.

Content writer and published author in the plant-based health and wellness sphere. I’m just here to learn! awalkerjones.com

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