Introducing: Don’t Approve This SuperPAC

Last week, I filed paperwork with the Federal Election Commission to start an independent expenditure-only political action committee (or superPAC) named Don’t Approve This SuperPAC. Despite pleading with the FEC to not approve my superPAC by literally naming it “Don’t Approve This SuperPAC,” they went ahead and approved it anyway.

You read that right, I have a superPAC. Like, actually. Don’t believe me? You can check out the superPAC’s website at DontApproveThis.com.

Thanks to the Supreme Court’s ruling in Citizens United, I have the actual power to actually collect and spend unlimited amounts of actual money to influence the American political landscape.

I know what you’re thinking: “Wow! This is impressive! This must have been really difficult to do!”

Nope! Turns out it’s superEASY to start a superPAC. It took me 15 minutes to fill out the Statement of Organization form, which officially lists me as the “Unpaid Intern” and “Chief Con Man” of Don’t Approve This SuperPAC. Once I finished the application, I thought it might be difficult to find a bank who would open a public funds checking account for an organization with “Don’t Approve This” in its name. But, thanks to the great people at Trustco Bank, I was able to open a new account in less than 30 minutes!

“But Nick,” I hear you wondering. “How much did all of this cost?”

It’s true. There is a cost associated with starting a superPAC, and I’m not proud to admit that I paid it. In order to start a superPAC, you have to buy a stamp for the envelope you send your application in — and that stamp will set you back about 49 cents. It’s a small price to pay for the power to collect and spend unlimited amounts of money to influence the American political landscape.

As we move forward, I’m going to give some thought to what candidates and issues Don’t Approve This may advocate for (or against). In the meantime, I urge you all: don’t donate to Don’t Approve This SuperPAC.

Nick Butler
Don’t Approve This SuperPAC
Unpaid Intern & Chief Con Man


Originally published at www.sometimesweekly.com.