2019 — Ansible Takes Over As Top Cloud Configuration Management Tool

RightScale 2019 State Of The Cloud Report Shows Some Interesting Results

Vince Sesto
Mar 6 · 3 min read
Image courtesy of pexels.com

Wednesday the 20th of February say Flexera publish its “RightScale 2019 State of the Cloud” report. The report covers a large cross section of topics in the cloud arena including the adoption of cloud among enterprises and SMB, the amount enterprise are spending on cloud, the difference in public and private cloud use and the types of tools used to manage their cloud environments.

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This years report has shown that Ansible has over taken Chef and Puppet as the leading configuration management tool used by companies to manager their cloud infrastructure.

The report surveyed 786 IT professionals showing that Amazon Web Services still holds a majority of the public cloud adoption with Microsoft Azure steadily catching up. According to the report Google Cloud Platform is still a distant third. The increased use in cloud infrastructure has seen companies need to implement configuration management tools to help manage and configure their use of these services. Of the five big players in this space, Chef and Puppet no longer control the majority, as Ansible has taken over as the top configuration Management tool to use in this space.

Here are the most popular configuration tools used by both enterprises and SMBs, according to the report:

  • Ansible 41%
  • Chef 37%
  • Puppet 37%
  • Terraform 31%
  • Salt 18%

The interesting thing here is that Ansible actually grew from 36% in 2018 to 41% in 2019, overtaking Chef which only grew from 36% to 37%. Puppet also had a small increase from 34% to 37% to be equal second with Chef. The other big mover was Terraform which grew from 20% to 31% from the previous year.

Ansible has become a popular tool to use in recent years as it is able to manage a large number of servers by allowing users to create flexible, automated tasks that can be run from a centralised server and push changes out to remove hosts.

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About The Author

DevOps Engineer, Endurance Athlete and Author. As a DevOps Engineer I specialize in Linux and Open Source Applications. Particularly interested in Search Marketing and Analytic’s, and is currently developing my skills in devops, continuous integration, security, Splunk(UI and Reporting) and development(Java).

Splunk User Developer Administrator

The magazine has been set up as a share of knowledge and allow people to come together and provide useful insights into their use of Splunk in their day to day work, in an unbiased and friendly setting.

Vince Sesto

Written by

Splunk User Developer Administrator

The magazine has been set up as a share of knowledge and allow people to come together and provide useful insights into their use of Splunk in their day to day work, in an unbiased and friendly setting.

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