E-hailing global roaming adopted by Uber and Yandex, Grab’s funding plans & more

Welcome to our weekly news roundup, the place where you can find the most important information about urban mobility every Tuesday. Companies which made the headlines this week are: Uber & Yandex, Grab, Daimler & CleverShuttle, Careem, Next & Swvl, and GM and it’s Maven Gig.

Uber and Yandex join forces

Illustration from The Moscow Times

It would have been hard to miss, but in case you haven’t heard: Uber and Russia’s Yandex forged a joint venture to operate in Russia and five neighbouring countries. The Yandex vs. Uber war has come to an end to end up as a new company. What is interesting about the agreement is that Yandex and Uber will cooperate more than just in the countries where the joint venture plans to operate — they will now allow users to book rides on each other’s applications. This means that Yandex users will be able to book an Uber through their Yandex app without the need to download Uber and vice-versa. This is exactly what we have been doing at Splyt — global roaming for e-hailing is here to stay and two of the largest e-hailing companies have opted for it rather than competing in territories where there’s already a local champion. To learn more about our roaming API that enable cross app booking visit our website. Splyt already covers 380 cities worldwide with local champions such as Careem.

Read more about Uber and Yandex here:

Grab to raise $2 Billion from SoftBank and Didi

Rumour has it that Grab will be raising up to $2 billion from Japan’s SoftBank and Didi Chuxing. The deal is still not confirmed by any official spokesperson from either SoftBank or Grab. If the deal were to happen, Grab would become Southeast Asia’s most valued startup at more than $5 billion.

Read more about it here:

Daimler buses joining CleverShuttle on-demand mobility

CleverShuttle, an on-demand ride-sharing startup based in Berlin, has recently obtained an investment from Daimler Buses and subsidiary EvoBus. CleverShuttle coordinates shuttles for users travelling in similar directions — calculating the cheapest and fastest route for all passengers. Daimler’s stake in the startup was undisclosed. The investment once again marks the current trend in the automotive industry to start betting on on-demand mobility services beyond private ownership.

Read more about it here:

Careem’s public transport trinity

Careem, the leading ride-hailing service in the Middle East, has invested $500,000 in seed funding in Egyptian bus transportation startup, Swvl. The two-month-old startup works on providing commuters with bus transportation services, where customers can determine their pick up and drop off points and track buses’ schedule, as well as pay for the fair using the app. “Our investment in the company is a clear bet on the value we believe Swvl will bring to the Egyptian people and further fulfils our promise to be a source of inspiration to local start-ups.” — Magnus Olsson, Careem’s co-founder and chief experience officer. Careem is also in partnership with Next Future, the US based developer of the world’s first advanced smart transportation and goods movement system based on swarms of modular self-driving vehicles, which are envisioned to be the future of buses. Could the Careem be on its way to a public transport revolution?

Read more about it here:

General Motors Maven Gig launches pilot in Australia

GM’s Maven Gig — the car rental for gig economy workers — has partnered up with Uber in Sydney, Australia to allow Uber drivers to rent cars manufactured by GM. Sydney would be the first city outside the US where the Maven Gig will operate. It currently operates only in the US in San Diego and will soon launch in LA and San Francisco.

Read more about it here:


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