Doodling to Access Your Right Brain

When I was growing up I really enjoyed art, but I wasn’t much of an artist and as a result I didn’t pursue it as a hobby. The other day it occurred to me that I spend 99% of my creative energy in front of a computer — almost all of my effort was being driven by my left brain. I wondered if I could ‘restart’ my brain by picking up a pen and doodling. Milton Glaser in a piece titled Drawing is Thinking explained,

When you draw an object, the mind becomes deeply, intensely attentive. And it’s that act of attention that allows you to really grasp something, to become fully conscious of it.

Steven Heller from the Atlantic wrote,

Drawing, even in a primitive way, often triggers insights and discoveries that aren’t possible through words alone. Just think of all those napkins (or Post-Its) on which million-dollar ideas were sketched out.

So I began doodling and doodling and doodling. I carried my sketchbook everywhere. Before meetings. After meetings. I would doodle and doodle. Did it work? Yes. I really felt better after putting pen to paper. I was able to concentrate better. I had new insights into business problems. I was more relaxed. I was calmer.

When Apple announced their new iPad+Pencil I decided to move my doodling to glass. It didn’t give me the same feeling. The tactile feeling of my pen on the paper. The resistance. The errors. The mistakes. They are all part of the process. The process that helped me. So LOVE my iPad, but love my sketch pad more for doodling. Give it a try. Don’t worry about the result. Just pick up a pen or pencil and start doodling!

Here are some of my doodles:

One clap, two clap, three clap, forty?

By clapping more or less, you can signal to us which stories really stand out.