Gen Z Startup Founders Should Delay Early Revenue in Favor of Product Market Fit

Alexander Muse
Oct 31 · 3 min read
Photo by Austin Distel on Unsplash

The one thing almost all high growth startups have in common at their start is the fact that they don’t generate revenue. Ironically, investors often pressure startups to generate revenue as soon as possible. In my experience this is often a mistake and in most cases I’d recommend delaying revenue as long as possible.

Recently I wrote a piece for Forbes explaining why early stage investors often claim your lack of revenue is the reason they’re not investing where I argued they weren’t telling founders the truth. In most cases, in my experience, one of the worst things an early stage startup can do is generate revenue too early.

First, most startups need significantly more time than they think to build and refine their product or service. Investors actually know this and if they’re pushing for revenue prior to making an investment it is usually because they’re not that interested in your company. They’re usually just making an excuse.

In most cases a startup’s Minimum Viable Product (MVP) is the sort of product or service that a founder would be comfortable letting a prospect beta test for free not something they would be proud to sell. The advantage of not selling an MVP is that a startup can focus instead on achieving product market fit (PMF). It is a LOT easier to get potential customers to use your product if it is free and the more customers you have the quicker you’ll reach PMF. If you focus on finding paying customers it will take you much longer to reach PMF. The sales and contract negotiation process is very time consuming and will delay your ability to improve your product or service. Most startups simply don’t have the manpower to build AND sell so successful founders must pick one and I recommend building.

The biggest disadvantage of early revenue is the fact that “potential revenue” is almost always more exciting than “real revenue”. If an investor is excited about the prospects of your product or service they’ll imagine a percentage of the addressable market they think you might be able to capture and invariably their imagination will be FAR better than reality. Selling in the real world is far more challenging than in the mind of a venture capitalist. The truth is that your early sales will be far less lucrative and far less common than your later sales. Smart startups skip early sales in favor of more information and better later sales.

​Of course, this advice is all wrong if your goal is to bootstrap your startup. If you aren’t going to raise outside capital you should ALWAYS sell as soon as possible. Every dollar in revenue will allow you to build your startup without outside capital. It may take you twice as long to get your product right, but at the end of the day you’ll own 100% of your company. Remember, fewer than 1% of startups seeking capital ever raise a dime.

About The Author

Alexander Muse

Alexander Muse is a serial entrepreneur, author of the StartupMuse and Sous Vide Science, contributor to Forbes and managing partner of Sumo. Check out his podcast on iTunes. You can connect with him on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram.

Startup Muse

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Check out my latest cookbook: Sous Vide Science. Get it on Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/souvidescience

Startup Muse

by Alexander Muse

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