Never Eat Alone: Day 9 … with my family

Recently I thought — and wrote — a lot about work-life-blending. This weekend I decided to let my life take over. I am convinced you can only balance out work and life if you take breaks and focus on family, friends and hobbies 100 percent for a few days. For me it is kind of a detox. So I called my mom and my sister short notice and invited myself to their places. I
was so looking forward to traditionally German food and an hour sitting down at the big eating table. Because if you are single like me the opportunity to sit down on a table, celebrating eating with all the fancy gadgets like tablecloth, napkins, different types to cutlery are rare. In the office lunch is always quite simple.

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But todays lunch didn’t turn out as planned. My grandma reached a mature age of 92 and has to go to the hospital now and than. So in the morning of Day 9, I have sat in ER with my mom drinking café au lait and vegi soup from a vending machine for about 6 hours. Hardly a healthy lunch and hardly what I expected. My grandma is grumpy and harsh, but my grandma. She and my mom spend a great deal of their time taking care of my sister and I when we were young. My grandma stayed at home and cooked every day for the whole family. But if you think now of a lovely old lady with grey hair, you are mistaken. She is not the warmest person to phrase it nicely — I guess World War II and the challenging time afterwards took its toll and
shaped her personality. But she is family and family relations are the
strongest bonds you have in life.

However, if you work full-time most people spend even more time with their colleagues and business contacts than with family and friends. They become sort of your second family — with all the pros and cons. As with family most of the time you can’t choose whom you work with or who you have to deal with at work. So this weekend provided a lesson relevant for work and personal life: All relationships are special. Treat colleagues, business
contacts and friends like you would treat your family in an emergency. The
people around you make you to the person you are. You do not have to like then, but respect them. They can be your strongest champion or your hardest opponent but they will always influence you somehow — even unintentionally and unnoticed.

PS: Don’t get me wrong. I wasn’t bored in ER. My parents live in rural Brandenburg (Prussia. :-) ) and I expected to sit for hours without any excitement writing my blog. But I met great people there! Relatives that accompanied there beloved to ER to support them. Surprisingly there has even been a SQUAD team — policemen ready for battle. They brought in a guy that resisted arrest, attacked a policeman and had to be sedated. I never expected to see a handcuffed guy in ER. ;-)

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