Image by Annie Spratt

035 - The Inherent Beauty In Old Things

This something can’t be replicated by force or coercion, it must be allowed to develop of it’s own accord.


Every week I publish Sunday Letters to my email subscribers. It consists of a new article on creativity, art, work and how it all goes together, plus a summary of the weeks articles both on Storymaker and Larry G. Maguire. Below is yesterday’s issue of Sunday Letters. If you’d like to get it to your inbox you can jump on board here.


There’s a unique beauty in old things don’t you think?

That quality that seems to be inherent in the thing you just can’t put your finger on.

Old has character that’s been built up over time. It’s the scrapes and the dents, it’s the wear and tear of use and of service.

This character just can’t be replicated through short-cuts no matter how clever we try to be.

The old notebook, the vintage car, the leather shoes you bought 10 years ago that you just can’t throw out, the old jacket that you found in a market.

We invest value in things that have been around and have stood the test of time.

Some vintage cars command higher prices now than they did when they were first made and people are willing to part with serious cash to get their hands on them.

When I was a kid there was a popular store on Henry Street in Dublin that sold only worn Levi jeans. I’d go there whenever I could to get my second hand jeans.

It’s gone now but vintage clothes are still very popular.

The reason these things draw our attention and our cash is because they were built with love, dedication and complete commitment to making something beautiful.

Making Something Beautiful Takes Time

The world is on this ever decreasing spiral downwards into more and more convenience.

We live in a predominantly throwaway consumerist society that demands quick and easy. The quicker and easier something is the better.

Electronics last a year or two if you’re lucky and manufacturers build things with planned obsolescence and we seem to want it that way.

But life is not meant to be convenient, it’s supposed to be testing. We’re supposed to learn from doing and if we are constantly seeking an easy life it robs us of the benefit of experience.

There is a wonderful experience in making one-off things that take time to create — it’s called art

Taking the time make high-quality things that last has seemed to have lost its value, yet at the same time, we value these old things.

We try to create things that look old. Like jeans with designer holes in them, and old-style pubs that fall way short of authentic.

It’s a strange dichotomy.

Making beautiful things takes time and effort and sweat and toil. Without these ingredients there’s no test of the spirit, there’s no challenge to the psyche.

The creative process can’t be rushed, it must mature of its own accord.

However many people don’t understand the creative process, they think it can be boxed and made conform to the will of spreadsheets and schedules.

It’s unfortunate. Maybe we need to figure it out the hard way.

What You Missed This Week

I’m in Donegal on holidays with my family at the moment and although it’s tricky I’m still achieving output. Although promotion of my writing needs some work.

When I get back next week I’ll get stuck in a bit more.

Donegal is a beautiful county along the lines of scenic beauty with Kerry in my opinion. The landscape is wild and rugged only spoiled by the presence of people.

The beach in the evening here in Narin is a real sight to behold.

Anyway, here’s what went down this week;

Monday — The Rhythm

Tuesday — The Power Of Rhythm And Momentum

Wednesday — To Build Or Not To Build

Thursday — The Power Of Stories

Friday — The Flaw With Bigger Is Better Mentality

Saturday — Why Guinness Doesn’t Travel

Sunday — You’re reading it.

That’s all I’ve got for you today, see you tomorrow!

Larry


Originally published at larrygmaguire.com on July 16, 2017.

Like More of This Kind of Thing?

Howdy, I’m Larry, Writer & Artist. Thanks for taking the time to read my stuff. I write about art, creativity, business & marketing. When I’m not doing that I write short stories about the ordinary lives of people and the challenges they face. My stuff can be edgy, hard hitting, and sometimes controversial, but never contrived. If that’s your bag you can Sign-up To Sunday Letters Here.


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