The rise of the Atlanta startup hubs

Switchyards
Nov 11, 2015 · 5 min read
That’s Marta by the way

What’s happening?

It might not be completely obvious, but three new startup hubs are emerging in Atlanta right now. These “centers of gravity” were begun by experienced startup founders and are totally focused on making local startups successful.

Why is this so important?

Casual observers of startups in Atlanta might not realize the importance of this evolution, but the number and density of local startup resources are what define the most successful startups hubs in the country (eg Silicon Valley, SF, NYC). In less mature startup cities (like Atlanta), the best way to reproduce what happens in mature startup cities is for various local entrepreneurs to create hubs based on their individual backgrounds and this is exactly what’s happening in Atlanta right now. These three hubs are accelerating local startup activity quicker than you’d expect in a city that doesn’t have a long history of creating startups.

What defines a startup hub?

Why can’t a coffeehouse, a traditional office space or even a general co-working space be a startup hub?

  • There are lots of other people in the building who are startup founders. These founders have written an idea on a napkin and gotten their startup to hundreds of thousands or even millions in revenue. Smart, experienced people who come from larger companies, investors and advisors are helpful to the startup eco-system, but the most valuable support and guidance will come from people who have done it before.
  • 90% (or more) of people in the building every day are working on high-growth startups. Many general co-working spaces don’t focus on startups, so there are lots of different types of organizations of lots of different sizes. Many of these businesses are slower-growth, owner-operated businesses because the goal is rental revenue — there’s no natural filter to be intentional about filling the building with startups.
  • The building has lots of startup-focused events & programming. These include demo days where founders can practice presenting their business, events that attract local investors, meet-ups for developers/designers, etc.
  • Finally, because these hubs are the “center of gravity” for the various startup communities around town, visitors to these hubs are very startup focused. For example, other local entrepreneurs or investors. This further adds to the value of these communities.

Switchyards Downtown Club

Creating beautiful startups for consumers

Switchyards Downtown Club

Creating beautiful startups for consumers

Switchyards

Written by

The country’s first neighborhood work club. Join the waitlist.

Switchyards Downtown Club

Creating beautiful startups for consumers