The Startup
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The Startup

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Are You a Slave of the Pressure to Create Results Quickly?

You won’t get anywhere like this.

Bootstrapped businesses.

A bootstrapped business has the luxury of developing at its own pace. The owner has complete control over the speed, at which the business is developing. Or, as Seth argues, he or she can be happy to remain a small fish, for as long as it is helpful, or necessary.

Our brain is not wired for long-term thinking.

Conclusion:

In order for a business to develop into something meaningful, it needs to be in a constant state of improvement. You will need to take the necessary steps RIGHT NOW, that are going to improve your business on the long-term.

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Tim Rettig

Tim Rettig

Author of Struggling Forward: Embrace the Struggle. Achieve Your Dreams https://amzn.to/2JKYFso / Subscribe: http://bit.ly/2DCejTX / Email: rettigtim@gmail.com

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