Good Boss, Bad Boss — The Two Sides of Competitive Psychology

There are two types of leaders — which one are you?

Kevin Buddaeus
The Startup

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Photo by Adrià Crehuet Cano on Unsplash

We all are to a more or lesser degree competitive. If you want to win, being competitive is what motivates you to reach that goal. And both in research and product development, competition is what drives progress.

But when you are hyper-competitive, you may well end up pushing people away, creating a negative work environment, and come off as a selfish and insensitive narcissist.

There is a fine line between healthy competition and a damaging mindset that causes more harm than good. If you are in a position of responsibility, with a team relying on your guidance, then it’s crucial that you don’t let your own competitiveness get in your way.

And as the team leader, it’s your job to control and adjust the competition within your team. Only then can all members develop their true potential and drive your project forward.

The difference between competitiveness and hyper-competitiveness

Some people perceive competitiveness as something negative. But it’s not competitiveness that’s harmful. The damaging factor is the extreme type of competitiveness, also known as hyper-competitiveness. What’s…

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Kevin Buddaeus
The Startup

Follow me on this long journey to grow and learn together. We can make the world a better place. Connect with me via Twitter: @KBuddaeus