How to Make a Leader Go Insane for You and Want to Hire You Quickly

There are 14 counter-intuitive strategies to consider that challenge the norms.

Tim Denning
Jan 27, 2020 · 7 min read
Image Credit: Getty Images/TheRinger

Show your personality in your resume

Do you know how boring it is to read resumes? Ask any recruiter or hiring manager. People say the same stuff on repeat that they read from a resume guide or online business publication.

  • Highlight any work you’ve done in the community
  • Link to any work you’ve published on social media
  • Replace dry business vocabulary in your resume with sentences that show a touch of personality

The best interview is a conversation

Forbes Writer, Chris Westfall, says the best interview is a conversation. I couldn’t agree more. A conversation is informal and that’s where relationships are built. As soon as you get all structured and overly polite, you kill the chance to build a relationship.

Go beyond plain facts and achievements

Everyone will tell a prospective leader how good they are and all their wonderful achievements. It’s so boring and fairytale-like.

Spend just as much time talking about your losses as your wins

Leaders love it when you can talk about what you did well just as much as you can talk about what went wrong.

Focus on what they say

Rather than talking the whole way through, listen to what the leader says.

Listen carefully to the question

When the leader asks you a question, listen carefully. Don’t rush it and clarify the question if you need to. Try to understand what it is they are searching for before you answer.

Use calculated pauses

Before answering their question, pause. In fact the longer you pause, the more they’ll be intrigued with what you’re going to say. It creates suspense. People who are well-articulated and good at what they do think before speaking.

The goal is not to fill up the allocated time with lots of talking.

Your aim should be to fill up the time with a few meaningful stories and a handful of examples that show who you are as a person.

Show how you work with other people

The hardest part of any business is getting people to work together. A leader’s biggest worry when considering you for a role is whether you’ll get on with the team and work with them, not against them.

List areas you need to improve

Don’t wait to be asked. During one of your answers, that points out a win in your career, balance it with an area you need to improve. Pick an area like public speaking and then show them how you’re already improving in that area without anyone forcing you to.

Mention mutual connections and tell them to call

We all know the references you provide as part of the hiring process are a joke. All we do is pick 2–3 people who we know will say nice things about us and then offer up their names and phone numbers as though we didn’t call them beforehand and tell them what to say.

Don’t give them false compliments

You don’t need to suck up during the interview and give the leader false compliments. This is fakery, and it will get you nowhere.

Leave your ego outside

Flexing too much ego is an easy trap to fall into.

Back up your claims with facts

Job interviews can quickly get out of control. Before you know it you’re quoting every success you’ve had in your career and the leader you’re chatting to can’t get a word in — especially true for sales roles.

Dress slightly below formal

How you dress is important when meeting a leader. The typical advice says to wear your best suit or outfit. I disagree. The dress code for workplaces is changing. The days of being too formal, in most industries, are changing.

Leaders go insane when you’re yourself

That’s the common theme in each of these points. Leaders are looking for people that appear human and make mistakes as normal people do.

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Tim Denning

Written by

Aussie Blogger with 100M+ views — Writer for CNBC & Business Insider. Inspiring the world through Personal Development and Entrepreneurship — timdenning.com/wc

The Startup

Get smarter at building your thing. Follow to join The Startup’s +8 million monthly readers & +792K followers.

Tim Denning

Written by

Aussie Blogger with 100M+ views — Writer for CNBC & Business Insider. Inspiring the world through Personal Development and Entrepreneurship — timdenning.com/wc

The Startup

Get smarter at building your thing. Follow to join The Startup’s +8 million monthly readers & +792K followers.

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