How to track sales in RedBubble using Google Analytics

Rare Loot
Rare Loot
Dec 1, 2019 · 5 min read

This is a short blog post for RedBubble artists who want more insight into where they are getting sales from in order to optimise their designs. When I was searching for additional tips on sales tracking, I realised that beyond the Google Analytics Set up page, there wasn’t anything conclusive to explain how to optimise sales with analytics.

The main steps in this post are:

  1. Set up a Google Analytics account and attach to your redbubble page
  2. Wait to make some sales (you need this data to customise your GA insights)
  3. Review your Redbubble Dashboard for context
  4. Set up tracking links and click tracking where possible such as, Google’s Campaign Builder, Bit.ly, Social Media Analytics Dashboard
  5. Set up Goal conversions in Google Analytics

Wait to make some sales

I’m going to assume you’ve set up the GA account for RedBubble. Next step, you need to upload a few designs and make some sales. You’re probably thinking “I need data to know how to make more sales though!”. Listen most of your sales will initially come from Redbubble promoting your product and indexing your on Google Search.

See below:

How people find your Shop Audience Traffic Sources show you where the people who view your work are coming from.

Redbubble: Traffic we bring to you. We support our artists through Redbubble generated activities such as marketing emails, paid advertising, affiliates, our blog, and any searches conducted on the RB website.

Direct: Visitors who directly typed your URL into the browser’s address bar, clicked on a bookmark, or clicked on a link in an email or message. *Strong direct traffic means you have successful marketing and branding initiatives that lead fans to click on your links. Awesome!

Organic: Visitors from any search engine such as Google, Bing, or Yahoo!. This means that the visitor clicked on a search result and not a sponsored ad. *Tags, descriptions, and the title on your products help with organic visitors.”

Here’s my site traffic in the last few months. As I’ve added products, it gradually grew. You just have to keep going at it.

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Review your dashboard

As you can see above, I was getting nothing for 2 months then suddenly Redbubble started showing my products. Based on my data, there was one product in particular that kept showing up in searches which drove a lot of this traffic. That is why I say keep adding designs with good tagging, titles and descriptions until you hit a sweet spot. Also you can see the spike in Organic traffic, this is because your product doesn’t automatically appear in Google Search, this is the same with every webpage or website on the internet. To show up on Google searches you need to be patient.

Setting up tracking links where possible

Ideally you want to track your audience from the source. This means adding tracking on potential traffic sources including social media posts and clicks in your blog posts. Log into your Google Analytics account and go to Campaign URL Builder to create unique links that are tracked in your GA account. For example, when you post on Twitter with that link, in Google Analytics it will appear under it’s campaign name “Twitter post 27th Nov” (or whatever you named it).

If you’re using certain platforms like Pinterest or certain subreddits you may not be allowed to use tracking links. So you just have to rely on that platform’s analytics but make sure to search for workarounds because you want as much control over your analytics as possible.

Setting Goal Conversions in Google Analytics

As soon as you make your first sale, go to Google Analytics the next day and go to Behaviour > Overview and you will see a list of your most clicked on URLs. Make sure you’re only looking at the last 7 days so the link you’re looking for doesn’t go missing. In there somewhere is your conversion url — at the time of writing it should be:

This is the conversion url to track your sales on RedBubble.

Copy and paste this and go to:

Goals > Overview and if you haven’t created any goals it’ll ask you if you want to create some. Otherwise go to Admin and look for the Goals tab:

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And select NEW GOAL+. Fill the relevant fields and when comes to selecting the Goal metric, select the URL option and add that link you copied earlier. I would also recommend adding goals for audiences who spend a duration of time on your page (like 5 minutes?) and one for those who click on multiple pages per session. This is so you know whether people are opening your page and running away or actually considering your products.

Another tip is to “verify” your goal before completing the Goal Form so you know it works. If it works, you will get a “Conversion Rate” by the last 7 days if you followed this guide.

Bonus tip: You should look at where audiences are landing and leaving.

Go back to Behaviour tab and drill down like below:

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The only “exit page” that’s a positive is /checkout/success. Every other page is an opportunity for improvement. This is good for spotting trends in the type of pages people are not converting on. I have found product pages where the design hasn’t been sized well which meant I was guaranteed to lose the sale.

You can also go to the Landing Pages section and look at where people are coming from. In particular look at links that end in searchTerm={whatever term they entered}. You might find some insight into what people are searching for.

Thanks for reading, if you have any tips for RedBubble, feel free to share as I’m quite new to this as well.

If you made it to the end, hopefully you won’t mind me plugging my latest post on design tools that will allow you to design new PoD products quickly.

The Placeit vs Canva Debate for Non-Designers :)

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Rare Loot

Written by

Rare Loot

Experimenting with Python and Social Media APIs using web scraping, exploratory data analysis and amateur coding.

The Startup

Medium's largest active publication, followed by +718K people. Follow to join our community.

Rare Loot

Written by

Rare Loot

Experimenting with Python and Social Media APIs using web scraping, exploratory data analysis and amateur coding.

The Startup

Medium's largest active publication, followed by +718K people. Follow to join our community.

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